Volunteer Essentials

2015-cover

Think of Volunteer Essentials as your encyclopedia to Girl Scout volunteering that’s there when you need it. Three ways to find information:

  • Scroll through the Index of Keywords
  • Type a keywords in the main search field
  • Click on Volunteer Essential cover to view the full guide (PDF)

Index of Keywords

  • Funds - Disbanded Troop Funds

    If the service unit director cannot find leadership and decides to disband the troop, ideally troop funds will be used as planned by the girls in the troop prior to its disbanding. Page 137

  • Camping - Family Camping

    It is not appropriate for males to sleep in the same tent or room with Girl Scouts in the troop setting. This does not apply to family camping.
    Page 118

    Over 40 events are held at council camps each year offering opportunities for troop/weekend camping; day outings and family camping experiences.
    Page 124

  • GSGATL

    For your protection, do NOT discuss the incident or give out information to anyone except the police or GSGATL leadership. Page 33

  • Emergencies - Emergency Equipment

    Every vehicle used to transport campers and staff should be equipped with a first aid kit and emergency accessories such as fire extinguisher and reflectors. Page 88

  • Dues - Membership

    Each member also agrees to follow safety guidelines and pay the annual membership dues of $15.
    Page 8

    All adult volunteers, except those adults serving as temporary advisors or consultants, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement and must pay the applicable membership dues on an annual basis and meet GSUSA membership requirements.
    Page 23

    Membership dues are non-refundable.
    Page 28

    The cost of membership, which includes annual GSUSA dues, optional uniforms, and any resources parents/ guardians will need to buy (such as a girl’s book for a Journey).
    Page 80

    A portion of the individual annual membership dues pays for supplementary insurance for the member only. 
    Page 91

    One of the steps required to become a Girl Scout is to fill out a Membership Registration fo...



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  • First Class

    The First Class Award existed for only two years, from 1938–1940, and was replaced in 1940 with The Curved Bar Award, the requirements for which were updated in 1947. Page 58

  • Ambassador - Finances

    Select the bank of your choice and a contact person at the bank who will receive the authorization form and fax it directly to GSGATL after process is completed.
    Page 100

    The group volunteer retains overall responsibility for long-term budgeting and record-keeping, but shares or delegates all other financial responsibilities. 
    Page 111

  • Cadette - Uniform

    The official Girl Scout uniform for girls is a white shirt (either their own or the official Girl Scout polo shirt for their program level), their own khaki pants or skirt, and the official program level tunic, vest, or sash. 
    Page 32

    Cadette Insignia Tab. 
    Page 66

  • Disqualification

    The criminal offenses that will generally disqualify a person from volunteer participation and the corresponding process used to determine disqualification are discussed below.  Page 25

  • Cookie Program - Volunteers

    For more information about volunteer applications and the background screening process, contact GSGATL’s Volunteer Helpline at 770-702-9411 (helpline@gsgatl.org). Page 133

  • Girls Scout Day

    There are also over twenty volunteer-run Girl Scout Day Camps in our council which are sponsored by local service units. Page 124

  • Cadette - Finances

    At the Cadette level and above, an adult mentors the girls as they keep the troop’s financial records and give reports to parents and troop volunteers.
    Page 100

    Girls keep their own financial records and give reports to parents and group volunteers.
    Page 111

     

  • First Aid - Requirements

    First-aid/CPR training that is available entirely online does not satisfy Girl Scouts’ requirements.
    Page 94

    First Aider* – Serves as the required adult first aider; is currently certified in first aid and CPR (or a doctor, nurse, paramedic, first responder, etc.) Training for this certification is available through GSGATL Volunteer Learning and Development.
    Page 133

  • Camping - Resident Camp

    Resident Camp offers girls entering kindergarten (plus Mom) and older the opportunity to camp for two to fourteen days and nights (the average is six nights).  Page 123

  • Camping - Refunds

     If you cancel at least thirty days in advance of your camp date, a portion of your fees will be refunded. Page 131

  • Accident Procedure

    All accidents/incidents requiring treatment beyond basic first aid must be reported to GSGATL’s Risk Management at 770.702.9167.
    Page 32

    Attend to any ill or injured passengers. If medical care is needed, see that they are taken to nearest medical facility.
    Page 89

    After receiving a report of an accident, council staff will immediately arrange for additional assistance at the scene, if needed, and will notify parents/guardians, as appropriate.
    Page 96

  • Events

    Girl-led Beyond the Troop Events include both multitroop events and events held on the service unit level, whether for Girl Scouts only, for Girl Scouts and a parent or family, or for the wider community. Page 121

  • Events - Money-Earning

    The following examples of money-earning projects from councils and USA Girl Scouts Overseas committees, give girls a way to build public speaking, financial literacy, marketing, and other skills. Page 108

  • Girl-led - Ceremonies

    Girl Scouts’ Own is a girl-led ceremony that allows girls to explore their feelings and beliefs around a topic (such as the importance of friendship or the personal meaning they get from the Girl Scout Promise and Law) using spoken word, favorite songs, poetry, or other methods of expression. It is never a religious ceremony. Page 60

  • Bungee Jumping

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining). Page 92

  • Dues - Financial Assistance

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities. Page 101

  • Camping - Cabins

    Cabins with full Kitchens or Cabins with partial kitchens. Page 125

  • Goal Setting - Annual Fund

    The Annual Fund is essential to carrying out the mission of Girl Scouts. 
    Page 13

    In order to meet Annual Fund goals, volunteers are encouraged to solicit donations from parents.
    Page 109

  • Cruises

    All trips involving high risk activities, trips to the Birthplace in Savannah, extended trips (three nights or more), cruises, and international travel require written council permission in advance of the trip. 
    Page 114

    Cruises and international travel.
    Page 115

    Cruises and International trips: one to three years prior to departure. 
    Page 117

  • Camping - Campsite 411

    Campsite 411 can be found on the council Web site.  Be sure to read the descriptions in Campsite 411 closely so you are sure that you are getting the type of facility you and the girls want or need. Page 128

  • Camping - Age Guidelines

    When girls (14 years old and older) show an interest in traveling abroad, contact GSGATL to get permission to plan the trip and download the Global Travel Toolkit. 
    Page 112

    If girls are not able to choose the what/when/where/who and how of a trip, it may not be age-appropriate!
    Page 116

  • Dismissal

    Providing false information on the application is grounds for automatic dismissal from participation as a GSGATL volunteer, regardless of the result of the criminal background search.
    Page 24

    In any organization, situations may arise which make it necessary to consider releasing an individual from their volunteer assignment. 
    Page 27

    Violation of these policies regarding alcohol and substance abuse will result in immediate disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.
    Page 34

    When GSGATL in its discretion determines that it is reasonably necessary to safeguard girl members, GSGATL may notify the parents or guardians of all girl members of a troop regarding: (a) the status of a troop leader or volunteer or family member as a Registered Sex Offender; (b) the requirements of this Policy; and (c) the steps taken by GSGATL to comply with the policy (for instance, the dismissal of, or written notice as described above to, the Registered Sex Offender.)...



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  • Badges

    In addition to the Leadership Journeys, girls at each Girl Scout grade level have their own edition of The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting—a binder full of information about being a Girl Scout and how to earn certain badges, including ones about financial literacy and the Girl Scout Cookie Program.
    Page 50

    Badge & Sash: the Girl Scout Badge & Sash Stores are our council-operated Girl Scout shops; they carry most of the items found in the Girl Scout Catalog or online.
    Page 139

  • Cookie Program - Safety

    A few other considerations will help keep girls safe.
    Page 104

    The girls must sign the Girl Scout Internet Safety Pledge (available at www.girlscouts.org/help/internet_safety_pledge. asp) before doing any online activities, and all online activities must be under the supervision of adults. 
    Page 106

  • Budget - Service Unit Budget

    In order to cover related administrative costs and create opportunities for inter-troop activities, service units develop an operating budget or financial plan, which should be proposed at a regular service unit meeting and accepted, with or without modification, by the service unit members (all registered adult volunteers in the service unit area). Page 101

  • Fees - Participation

    Some events may require an additional service unit fee.
    Page 9

    While troop membership will not be denied based on an inability to pay these fees, participation in troop activities may depend on ability to contribute.
    Page 38

  • eBiz - Learning Opportunities

    eBiz is a web-based system hosted by GSUSA that allows for members to purchase their GSUSA membership online, register for events and enroll in GSGATL-sponsored learning opportunities. Page 81

  • Facilities - For Troop Meetings

    You might consider using meeting rooms at schools, libraries, houses or worship, community buildings, childcare facilities, and local businesses. Page 70

  • eBiz - Troop Management

    Troop volunteers registered as “01” troop leaders (one per troop) have access to the eBiz Troop Management module, a system that allows them to register all members of their troop in one payment as well as update troop meeting details and member contact information. Page 81

  • Badge & Sash

    When needing large quantities (more than 48 badges, fun patches, more than six of anything else such as gift items and clothing items except sashes and vests), please call and place your order at least three weeks in advance in order to ensure that we will have sufficient stock to meet your needs.
    Page 12

    Badge & Sash: the Girl Scout Badge & Sash Stores are our council-operated Girl Scout shops; they carry most of the items found in the Girl Scout Catalog or online.
    Page 139

  • Camping - With Males

    There are no rules that preclude a male adult, who is invited by the troop, from troop camping with Girl Scouts.  Page 118

  • Commercial Products

    We rely on donations from parents, individuals, local businesses, organizations, corporations, foundations, United Way and government agencies to ensure Girl Scouting remains available and affordable for all families. 
    Page 108

    Commercial products” means any product sold at retail. Since 1939, girls and volunteers have not been allowed to endorse, provide a testimonial for, or sell such products. » Girl Scout funds and sponsoring organization funds should never be comingled.
    Page 109

  • Drama

    Drama - The following chart shows some of the activities that are offered at each camp. Page 123

  • Financial Plan - See Also Budget

    In order to cover related administrative costs and create opportunities for inter-troop activities, service units develop an operating budget or financial plan, which should be proposed at a regular service unit meeting and accepted, with or without modification, by the service unit members (all registered adult volunteers in the service unit area).
    Page 101

    The group can brainstorm and make decisions about its financial plans. 
    Page 110

  • Camping - Financial Assistance

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities. Page 101

  • Bridging

    Bridging ceremonies mark a girl’s move from one grade level of Girl Scouting to another, such as from Junior to Cadette.
    Page 60

    Bridging is the process of moving from one Girl Scout program level to the next.
    Page 139

  • Approved Volunteer

    Approved Volunteer: a person who has completed and submitted a Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta volunteer application and background check, and has been approved as a volunteer.  Page 139

  • Activities - troop meetings

    You help each troop member do her part to ensure the meeting and activities are enriching and fun.

  • Girl Scout Research Institute

    Since its founding in 2000, the Girl Scout Research Institute has become an internationally recognized center for research and public policy information on the development and well-being of girls. Not just Girl Scouts, but all girls.  
    Page 76

    According to Feeling Safe: What Girls Say, a 2003 Girl Scout Research Institute study, girls are looking for groups that allow connection and a sense of close friendship.
    Page 77

  • Benefits and Services

    Benefits and services to volunteers may include training and other learning opportunities, support from GSGATL staff and other council volunteers, GSUSA and GSGATL publications and Web site, tools for recording volunteer experiences, awards and recognitions, and performance evaluations. Page 30

  • Checking Account - See Also Bank Account

    Girl Scout troops and groups are encouraged to open a troop checking account when the amount of funds on hand reaches $100.00 or meets the minimum requirements of the chosen bank.Page 99

  • Budget

    At the Daisy and Brownie level, girls may collect and record dues, but the troop volunteer handles money and keeps financial records; she or he does all troop budgeting, but explains the process to girls and gets their input on activities and purchases. 
    Page 100

    Use a budget worksheet that includes both expenses (the cost of supplies, admission to events, travel, and so on) and available income (the group’s account balance, projected cookie proceeds, and so on).
    Page 110

  • Chartered Vehicles

    If renting or chartering a vehicle for a trip, please allow at least two weeks for GSGATL approval. Page 88

  • Debit Cards

    Use debit cards during the activity or trip. Page 98

  • First Aid

    She is ready when she...» knows health and safety rules, use of the buddy system, simple first aid, staying safe and sound, what to do in an emergency.
    Page 126

     Your troop’s certified first-aider would be a good person to help girls review safety rules, check out the first aid kit and practice simple first aid.
    Page 127

  • amping - National Forests

    In addition to GSGATL’s five council camps, Girl Scouts may camp on other Girl Scout council campsites, or other youth agency camps; in state parks or national forests; or private campsites. 

  • Camping - Council Properties

    The possession of firearms at any Girl Scout event on council property will be grounds for dismissal.
    Page 36

    54% is returned to leaders and girls in program opportunities, maintenance of 5 camp properties covering 2400 acres, insurance, program supplies, financial assistance, training, background checks, regional service centers and Girl Scout Badge & Sash Stores, $52,000 in scholarships for higher education and the Web site for up-to-date events, information and training and other business operations.
    Page 103

    Resident camping is available at five of our council’s camps: Pine Valley, Pine Acres, Timber Ridge, Meriwether and Misty Mountain.
    Page 123

    Each camp has sites (units) for beginning and intermediate campers as well as advanced campers. 
    Page 124

     

  • Girl-led - Business

    Did you know that the Girl Scout Cookie Program is the largest girl-led business in the country, with sales of more than $700 million per year for girls and their communities nationwide? Page 102

  • Emails

    Girls can market cookies and other products by posting on social media sites like Facebook or Twitter or sending emails to friends, family members, and former customers, as long as they use a group email address, the account or address of a parent/guardian or adult volunteer, a blind email address (in which the recipients cannot see the sender’s email address), or the online email tools provided by council-sponsored vendors. 
    Page 104

    Girls are texting, calling, emailing, Tweeting, and Facebooking—and those are all effective ways that girls 13 and older can promote cookie and other product programs. 
    Page 106

    Girl Scout Daisies are allowed to send out emails only when working directly with an adult.
    Page 107

  • Cadette - Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls. Page 18

  • Food Allergies

    Common food allergies include dairy products, eggs, soy, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, and seafood. This means that, before serving any food (such as peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, cookies, or chips), ask whether anyone is allergic to peanuts, dairy products, or wheat! 
    Page 91

    If girls choose to include snacks, guide them to consider the health of a potential snack, as well as possible food allergies.
    Page 134

  • Daisy - Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls.  Page 18

  • Girl Scout Leadership Experience

    The Girl Scout program is based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), in which girls Discover themselves, Connect with others, and Take Action to make the world a better place—all within the safety of an all-girl environment where girls take the lead, learn by doing, and learn cooperatively. 
    Page 14

    Understanding the Three Keys to Leadership that are the basis of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience: Discover, Connect, and Take Action.
    Page 20

    The Girl Scout program—what girls do in Girl Scouting—is based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), a national model that helps girls become leaders in their own lives and as they grow. 
    Page 45

    GSLE (Girl Scout Leadership Experience) is what girls do in Girl Scouting, how they do it, and how they will benefit from it.
    Page 139

  • Camping - Troop Camper

    Trained Troop Camper* – Completes councilsponsored troop camping training, then trains girls and other adults and accompanies them to camp.  Page 133

  • Funds - Unused

    Unused Girl Scout money left in accounts when groups disband becomes the property of the council. Prior to disbanding, the group may decide to donate any unused funds to a worthwhile organization, to another group, or for girl activities. Page 98 

  • Fees - Insurance

    There is a nominal fee for this coverage which the troop is responsible for paying. Page 91

  • Fundraising

    Fundraising refers to activities that raise funds for Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta. Page 40

  • Convenience

     For both programs, customers will incur a convenience fee for credit card usage and/or shipping charges for delivery of products. Page 105

  • Financial Assistance

    Financial Assistance for Travel and Training. 
    Page 30

    The availability of financial assistance and how the Girl Scout Cookie Program and other product programs generate funds for the group treasury.
    Page 80

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities.
    Page 101

    54% is returned to leaders and girls in program opportunities, maintenance of 5 camp properties covering 2400 acres, insurance, program supplies, financial assistance, training, background checks, regional service centers and Girl Scout Badge & Sash Stores, $52,000 in scholarships for higher education and the Web site for up-to-date events, information and training and other business operations.
    Page 103

    Financial assistance is available for girls whose family cannot afford the annual national membership du...



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  • Brownie

    After girls join, they team up in the following grade levels.

  • Business Ethics

    In addition to giving girls an opportunity to earn money to fund their Girl Scouting goals, taking part in the Girl Scout Cookie Program teaches girls five important skills that serve them throughout their lives: goal setting, money management, people skills, decision making, and business ethics. Page 51

  • Beyond the Troop Event

    The adult event director submits a Beyond the Troop Event Application, and other supporting documents, including a completed Money Earning Application, to the council risk management department for preapproval of the event. 
    Page 39

    Girl-led Beyond the Troop Events include both multitroop events and events held on the service unit level, whether for Girl Scouts only, for Girl Scouts and a parent or family, or for the wider community.
    Page 121

  • Decision Making

    In addition to giving girls an opportunity to earn money to fund their Girl Scouting goals, taking part in the Girl Scout Cookie Program teaches girls five important skills that serve them throughout their lives: goal setting, money management, people skills, decision making, and business ethics.
    Page 51

    A Girl Scout who decides with her troop how to use troop proceeds grows her confidence to make decisions about spending baby-sitting money or being a leader to resist negative peer pressure. 
    Page 103

  • Annual Fund

    Any funds raised in excess of the project’s needs by any means must be used as follows: » to extend the Take Action project through additional direct or in-kind donations, » returned to the original donors, » or donated to the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Annual Fund. 
    Page 40

    Our Council invests about $325 per girl each year to provide a high-quality leadership experience. Every penny of the $15 membership dues goes to our national organization, Girl Scouts USA, which means we rely on our members to support us locally by giving to Annual Fund. 
    Page 82

  • eBiz - Hotline

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta has trained eBiz Hotline staff who are extremely knowledgeable when it comes to all things eBiz. Page 81

  • Cadette - Awards

    Once a girl checks the Awards Log in The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting to make sure there’s not already a badge on the topic she wants to explore, she’ll follow steps outlined in her handbook to complete the requirements for her very own badge.
    Page 51

    The Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are Girl Scouting’s highest awards.
    Page 58

  • Caving

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. Page 114

  • Camping - Reservations

    If a troop wishes to pre-visit a camp, a day-use area may be reserved through the camp registrar.
    Page 127

    Complete the troop camping reservation form on or after the following dates:
    Page 130

  • Girl-led - Financial Planning

    One of your opportunities as a volunteer is to facilitate girl-led financial planning. Page 110

  • Cooperative Learning

    The Girl Scout program is based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), in which girls Discover themselves, Connect with others, and Take Action to make the world a better place—all within the safety of an all-girl environment where girls take the lead, learn by doing, and learn cooperatively. 
    Page 14

    Girls have the chance to learn cooperatively. 
    Page 17

    Working in a partnership with girls so that their activities are girl-led, allow them to learn by doing, and allow for cooperative (group) learning; you’ll also partner with other volunteers and GSGATL staff for support and guidance. 
    Page 20

  • Funds - Service Unit

    A volunteer may enter into an agreement on behalf of or between a troop and/or a service unit only within GSGATL Troop and Service Unit Money Management Guidelines found in Volunteer Essentials.
    Page 37

    Service team members may help organize troops, mentor new leaders, help girls plan service unit-wide events, track the training and recognitions of other volunteers in the service unit, manage service unit funds, set up a service unit Web site, chair the Annual Fund, the Cookie Program, or the Treats & Keeps Program. 
    Page 140

  • Global Girl Scouting

    Global Girl Scouting ensures that girls have increased awareness about the world, cross-cultural learning opportunities, and education on relevant global issues that may inspire them to take action to make the world a better place. Page 10

  • Cookie Program - Patches

    Patches are cloth award emblems; some are official, but many are not! Page 140

  • Blob (Water Activity)

    *Blob JR CD SR AM -  Must be comfortable swimming in deep water. Page 92

  • Cadette

    After girls join, they team up in the following grade levels: Girl Scout Cadette (grades 6–8).
    Page 8

    At the Girl Scout Cadette level (sixth, seventh, and eighth grades), girls . . .Are going through puberty, including changes in their skin, body-shape, and weight. 
    Page 72

  • Go-Carts

    Go-Carts - Restricted - Age 12 & above – must have prior written approval from GSGATL and parents. Page 92

  • Emergencies - Emergency Care

    Seatbelts should be fastened — one person per seatbelt — unless being transported prone for emergency care.
    Page 89

    Girls need to receive proper instruction in how to care for themselves and others in emergencies. 
    Page 93

  • Flag Ceremonies

    Flag ceremonies can be part of any activity that honors the American flag, and are often used to open troop or service unit meetings, camporees and community events. Page 60

  • Debt Collection

    When an adult in any volunteer position with GSGATL has a personal outstanding debt to GSGATL, GSGATL has the right, at its discretion, to remove the volunteer from her or his position and not reinstate the volunteer. Page 37

  • Fees

    New troops or groups may ask, but not require, parents to donate to a one-time startup fee when the troop begins meeting. 
    Page 38

    Start-Up Fees are often collected by new troops to purchase the basic supplies they need to get started. Parents may be asked, but never required, to contribute up to $25 or make an in-kind donation (first aid supplies, for example) to the troop. 
    Page 140

  • Disbanding a Troop

    When a troop splits or disbands, the girls discuss and agree about what to do with the troop funds. In no instance does the money become the property of an individual member or troop volunteer. 
    Page 38

    Unused Girl Scout money left in accounts when groups disband becomes the property of the council. 
    Page 98

    When a troop disbands, by rights the funds revert to GSGATL.
    Page 101

    If the service unit director cannot find leadership and decides to disband the troop, ideally troop funds will be used as planned by the girls in the troop prior to its disbanding. 
    Page 137

  • Fire - Cooking Fire

    If you must cook over wood, keep your fire to the bare minimum needed to get the food cooked. Page 129

  • event - Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls. Page 18

  • Camping - Emergencies

    All accidents/incidents requiring treatment beyond basic first aid must be reported to GSGATL’s Risk Management at 770-702-9167.
    Page 32

    Prior to any event or activity, review the emergency procedures and evacuation routes specific to activity site. 
    Page 95

    Follow these procedures when emergency response or immediate action by authorities is required.
    Page 97

    Know the emergency procedures for the site.
    Page 127

  • Facilities - For Males

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta does not allow boys over the age of 10 to participate in troop camping on GSGATL properties.  Page 118

  • Emergencies - Emergency Care

    Seatbelts should be fastened — one person per seatbelt — unless being transported prone for emergency care.
    Page 89

    Girls need to receive proper instruction in how to care for themselves and others in emergencies. 
    Page 93

  • Daisy -Trips

    Girl Scout Daisies, for example, can begin with a discovery walk.
    Page 112

    Girl Scout Daisies - Start out with short, local trips of several hours duration. 
    Page 116

  • Background Check

    Prospective volunteers will complete a volunteer application and consent to a background check and will be placed by an authorized GSGATL representative.
    Page 23

    Appointment to a volunteer position with GSGATL is contingent upon completion and review of a volunteer application, criminal background check, and possibly reference checks.
    Page 24

    The following rules generally will apply if GSGATL learns (via criminal background check or otherwise) that a prospective or current volunteer has been convicted in the past seven years of one of the following crimes under the laws of the state of Georgia, another state in the United States, or another country.
    Page 25

    GSGATL reserves the right to permanently deny anyone a volunteer position if GSGATL officials believe the person is inappropriate for that position. 
    Page 26

    Criminal background checks include a time frame of at least seven years; therefore, it is appropriate that the volunteer must be dismiss...



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  • Ambassador - Activities

    Use guidelines based on the program level of the youngest girl in the troop when considering troop activities. Page 92

  • Camping - Troop Camping

    Overnight troop (group) camping, often referred to as “weekend camping” in our council, is available for girls in kindergarten and older, and typically lasts over three consecutive days and two nights. Page 124

  • Girl Scout Leadership Experience - Three Keys to Leadership

    We have identified Three Keys to Leadership: girls discover themselves and their values; connect with others; and take action to make the world a better place.
    Page 7

    And everything you do with girls in Girl Scouting is aimed at giving them the benefits of these Three Keys to Leadership. 
    Page 45

  • Camping - Discounts

    Girls who participate in the Girl Scout Cookie Program receive a discounted rate for attending one of our council resident camps. Page 123

  • Girl Scout Leadership Experience - Three Processes

    In keeping with the three processes of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience, be sure that: » All activities are girl-led. 
    Pages 17

    We call these three methods “processes.”
    Page 46

  • Camping - Platform Tents

    Platform Tents. Page 125

  • Emotional Abuse

    Physical, verbal, and emotional abuse of girls is also forbidden. 
    Page 19

    Any act of child abuse or neglect, including physical, sexual, verbal or emotional abuse or neglect by any volunteer, male or female, against any girl member, shall not be tolerated. Girl Scout volunteers are also responsible for protecting the well-being of girl members by reporting any witnessed or suspected abuse or neglect.
    Page 34

    Sexual advances, improper touching, and sexual activity of any kind with girl members are forbidden. Physical, verbal, and emotional abuse of girls is also forbidden. 
    Page 85

  • Girl Scout Sign

    Over time, any organization is going to develop a few common signals that everyone understands.
    Page 61

    Shake left hands and give the Girl Scout Sign with your right hand. (The “left handshake” unites Guides and Girl Scouts in every WAGGGS member country.)
    Page 62

  • East Region

    East Region: DeKalb, Forsyth, Gwinnett and North Fulton. Page 10

  • Junior - Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls. Page 18 

  • International Trips

    International trips (age 14 and older): Travel around the world, often requiring one or two years of preparation. 
    Page 112

    Cruises and international travel.
    Page 115

    Cruises and International trips: one to three years prior to departure. 
    Page 117

  • Jamborees

    Girl Scout Getaways and Guide/Scout Jamborees: Troop travel also includes national Getaways and international Jamborees, which range from two days to three weeks and are for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors. 
    Page 113

  • Junior - Travel

    Extended overnight trips (Juniors and older): Three or four nights camping or a stay in a hotel, motel, or hostel within the southeastern United States.
    Page 112

    Girl Scout Juniors Day travel is unlimited. They may take overnight trips of one or more nights based on previous troop travel experiences. 
    Pages 116

  • Troop - Sizes

    It is recommended that group sizes, when possible, are as follows: » Girl Scout Daisies: 5–12 girls » Girl Scout Brownies: 10–20 girls » Girl Scout Juniors: 10–25 girls » Girl Scout Cadettes: 5–25 girls » Girl Scout Seniors: 5–30 girls » Girl Scout Ambassadors: 5–30 girls. Page 18

  • Pine Acres

    Resident camping is available at five of our council’s camps: Pine Valley, Pine Acres, Timber Ridge, Meriwether and Misty Mountain. 
    Page 123

    Day camping is available concurrent with resident camp at both Timber Ridge and Pine Acres.
    Page 124

    Pine Acres
    Page 125

  • Money-Earning

    Troop treasuries may consist of funds from troop money-earning projects, dues, and donations.
    Page 37

    Money-earning refers to activities troops and service units engage in to earn revenue that directly supports the troop or service unit. 
    Page 39

    Girls earn money in two distinct ways.
    Page 102-103

     

  • Troop - Committee

  • Trips. See also Travel

    Not only do some of the most memorable moments in a Girl Scout’s life happen while taking trips, but travel also offers a wealth of opportunities for girls to develop leadership skills.  Page 112

  • Reporting Abuse

    Report abuse. 
    Page 19

    Follow your council’s guidelines as well as state laws for reporting concerns about abuse or neglect that may be occurring inside or outside of Girl Scouting. 
    Page 85

  • GSLE - See Girl Scout Leadershio Experience

    The Girl Scout program is based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), in which girls Discover themselves, Connect with others, and Take Action to make the world a better place—all within the safety of an all-girl environment where girls take the lead, learn by doing, and learn cooperatively. Page 14

  • Troop - Leadership

    If big changes are happening in the troop (older girls bridging, leaders “retiring” or moving away) try to prepare the girls as far in advance as possible. Page 137

  • Journeys - And High Awards

    This is why, to earn each of these awards, girls first complete a grade-level Journey (two Journeys for the Gold Award or a Silver Award and one Journey). Page 58

  • Training - Mandated Reporter

    All adult volunteers who interact with girls recognize that they are mandated reporters. Page 36

  • My Promise, My Faith

    The Girl Scout Law includes many of the principles and values common to most faiths. Page 51

  • Membership - Department

    If a solution is not resolved privately between the two parties involved, the next step is for one or both or all individuals to file a written Situation Report (form available on the GSGATL Web site or from Membership and Volunteer Experience staff members) with her/his next level of support. Page 29 

  • Library

    Resource Centers are your Girl Scout libraries: the Mableton, Dalton and Griffin Service Centers/Offices have a resource room where volunteers may check out books, videos, activity kits, flags, and other materials whenever the center is open.
    Page 14

    You’ll find tips for helping girls plan their ceremonies, ceremony ideas and sample ceremonies, at Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta’s online Resource Library. 
    Page 60

  • Journeys - Maps

    Check out the Journey maps at www.girlscouts.org/program/journeys/ maps. Page 14

  • Troop Finance Report Form

    Troop Finance Report - Submit this form annually to your service unit director. » www.gsgatl.org/volunteer-essentials/troop-finance-report. Page 141

  • Medical Examinations

    For various reasons, some parents/guardians may object to immunizations or medical examinations. Page 91

  • Safety - Volunteer Responsibilities

    Every adult in Girl Scouting is responsible for the physical and emotional safety of girls, and we all demonstrate that by agreeing to follow these guidelines at all times. Page 85

  • Journeys

    Getting Started with the National Leadership Program through Journeys.
    Page 14

    Journeys (Leadership Journeys) are a hands-on approach to teaching leadership skills to Girl Scouts of all ages. 
    Page 139

  • Opening Ceremony

    Opening ceremonies start troop meetings and can also begin other group meetings.
    Page 60

    The opening focuses attention and allows girls to start the meeting.
    Page 133

    Girl or small group chooses and/or leads opening activity, which might be a flag ceremony, a song or poem, the Girl Scout Promise and Law, or something created by the girls; it could also be the opening activity from the Journey Sample Session. 
    Page 135

  • Political Fundraisers

    Steer clear of political fundraisers: When in an official Girl Scout capacity or in any way identifying yourselves as Girl Scouts, your troop may not participate (directly or indirectly) in any political campaign or work on behalf of or in opposition to a candidate for public office. Page 109

  • Tornado

    Tornado Watch a) Darkened skies, thick storm clouds, and strong winds from the south combined with lightning and periods of rain and hail, often precede a tornado’s arrival. Page 96

  • Online Registration

    Online Registration Hotline/eBiz . . . . . 770-702-9650 
    Page ii

    eBiz is a web-based system hosted by GSUSA that allows for members to purchase their GSUSA membership online, register for events and enroll in GSGATL-sponsored learning opportunities. 
    Page 81

     

  • Program Activities

    Use guidelines based on the program level of the youngest girl in the troop when considering troop activities.  Page 92

  • Pinning

    Pinning ceremonies help celebrate when girls receive grade-level Girl Scout pins. Page 60

  • Resource Centers

    Resource Centers are your Girl Scout libraries: the Mableton, Dalton and Griffin Service Centers/Offices have a resource room where volunteers may check out books, videos, activity kits, flags, and other materials whenever the center is open. Page 14

  • Safety Activity Checkpoints

    When preparing for any activity with girls, start by reading the Girl Scout Safety Activity Checkpoints for that particular activity at www.gsgatl.org/volunteeressentials/safety-activity-checkpoints on Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta’s Web site. 
    Page 17

    Follow the Safety Activity Checkpoints. 
    Page 19

    Every adult in Girl Scouting is responsible for the physical and emotional safety of girls, and we all demonstrate that by agreeing to follow these guidelines at all times. 
    Page 85

    Prior to any activity, read the specific Safety Activity Checkpoints related to any activity you plan to do with girls. 
    Page 90

    Follow Safety Activity Checkpoints (located online at www.gsgatl.org). 
    Page 115

    These sites must meet the guidelines for troop camping in the Safe...



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  • Money-Earning Application

    Troops must submit a Money Earning Application along with the latest copy of the troop’s bank statement to the appropriate service unit team member. Page 107

  • Pathways

    In an effort to make the Troop Pathway to Girl Scouts fun for girls, easier for leaders, and still meet the goals set by Girl Scouts of the USA, Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta has established a minimum troop size for new troops by program level. 
    Page 9

     Although some girls who are in a group (for example, a troop of Cadettes) may decide to travel together, the Travel Pathway exists for girls who are not otherwise involved in Girl Scouts to get together Chapter 7: Trips, Travel and Events 112 Volunteer Essentials — Chapter 7: Trips, Travel and Events specifically for the purpose of traveling locally, regionally, and even internationally.
    Page 112-113

    Let girls who feel their life is too busy for troop meetings know that’s okay—Girl Scouts offers many ways (pathways) to participate. 
    Page 137

  • Restriction of Leadership Activities

    If a current Girl Scout leader or assistant leader is charged with or convicted of, or has pled guilty to, received a deferred adjudication for, or pled no contest to, certain crimes, she or he may have restrictions placed on her or his volunteer activities or responsibilities, including, but not limited to, restrictions prohibiting direct contact with girl members. Page 28

  • Paypal

    Some troops use a PayPal account in addition to their bank account. Page 100

  • Training - Contact

    Adult Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9411. Page ii

  • Refund Procedures

    If written cancellation of a camp site is received at least 30 days prior to the scheduled camp date, and we are able to place a troop from a wait list, a refund less your $50 deposit will be applied. Page 131

  • Outdoor Program

    Over 40 events are held at council camps each year offering opportunities for troop/weekend camping; day outings and family camping experiences. Page 124

  • Membership - Lifetime Membership

    Processing and completing registration forms and other paperwork, such as Membership Registration Forms (paper forms are used when applying for financial assistance, paying with Cookie Dough, or when graduating seniors are purchasing a Lifetime Membership), permission slips, event applications, and troop financial reports to be shared with parents/guardians. Page 21

  • Physical Abuse

    Physical abuse is any non-accidental injury to a child. This includes hitting, kicking, slapping, shaking, burning, pinching, hair pulling, biting, choking, throwing, shoving, whipping, and paddling.
    Page 35

    Physical abuse is injury to a child under age 18 by a parent or caretaker which results in bruises, welts, fractures, burns, cuts or internal injuries.
    Page 78

  • Indoor Skydiving

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. » Indoor Skydiving. Page 114

  • LUTE

    One way to communicate with girls is through the LUTE method—listen, understand, tolerate, and empathize. Page 76

  • Travel - Age Guidelines

    Girls can travel regardless of how else they are—or aren’t—participating in Girl Scouting.
    Page 113

    As you help girls choose and plan their trips, be sure they use these Travel Guidelines established for troop and other pathways in Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta.
    Page 116 

  • Troop - Pathway

    In an effort to make the Troop Pathway to Girl Scouts fun for girls, easier for leaders, and still meet the goals set by Girl Scouts of the USA, Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta has established a minimum troop size for new troops by program level.  Page 9

  • Misty Mountain

    Resident camping is available at five of our council’s camps: Pine Valley, Pine Acres, Timber Ridge, Meriwether and Misty Mountain.
    Page 123

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, Inc. operates five camps – Meriwether, Misty Mountain, Pine Acres, Pine Valley and Timber Ridge.
    Page 124

    Misty Mountain
    Page 125

  • Troop Meeting - Clean-Up

    Clean-up is a great habit for girls to get their meeting space back to the way it was when they arrived—maybe even cleaner! 
    Page 134

    Everyone is involved in clean-up! 
    Page 135

  • National Trips

    National trips (Cadettes and older): Travel anywhere in the country, often lasting a week or more. Page 112 

  • Recognition - Volunteer Recognition

    GSGATL believes every volunteer should be recognized for his or her contributions to building girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. GSGATL’s volunteer recognition program is designed to offer formal and informal recognition. 
    Page 22

    GSGATL, in recognition of its responsibility to its volunteers, its staff, and the girls it serves, and in keeping with Girl Scouts of the USA’s (GSUSA) emphasis on pluralism, reaffirms its policy to ensure fair and equal treatment in all its practices to all persons, regardless of race, color, religion, ethnicity, age, socio-economic status, disability or national origin.
    Page 23

    Benefits and services to volunteers may include training and other learning opportunities, support from GSGATL staff and other council volunteers, GSUSA and GSGATL publications and Web site, tools for recording volunteer experiences, awards and recognitions, and performance evaluations. 
    Page 30

    GSGATL’s volunteer recognition program is designed to be a valuable component of the volunteer support sy...



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  • Immunizations

    The staff at GSGATL take care in obtaining and storing girls’ health histories—which may include a physician’s examination and a list of immunizations—as needed.
    Page 91

  • People Skills

    People skills – Girls learn to listen and have confidence in speaking with others while asking for support of her and Girl Scouts with a purchase or cookies, chocolates, or magazines; she learns she can also work well with others for school projects or team sports; she asks for directions from teacher to achieve her best! Page 103

  • Junior - Finances

    At the Junior level, it is a shared girl-adult responsibility. 
    Page 100

    The group volunteer retains overall responsibility for long-term budgeting and record-keeping, but shares or delegates all other financial responsibilities.
    Page 111

  • Trips - Approval

    How do you know if the trip is approved? Page 117

  • Portfolio. See National Program Portfolio

    You’ll use several books, awards, and online resources to bring the Girl Scout Leadership Experience to life with girls. We strongly recommend that each girl has her own books from the National Program Portfolio. 
    Page 46

    The next few pages give you an idea of what’s involved when you use the National Program Portfolio with girls at each Girl Scout grade level. 
    Page 51

  • Junior - Activities

    At-A-Glance Guidelines for Program Activities for Girl Scouts. Page 92

  • Rappeling

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. Climbing & Rappelling. Page 114 

  • Membership - Financial Assistance

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities.  Page 101

  • Money Earning - Cookie Program

    Girls earn money in two distinct ways: » The Girl Scout Cookie Program and the Girl Scout Treats and Keeps Progam, organized by GSGATL and open to all Girl Scouts. Page 102

  • Travel - Approval

    Travel Approval: Troops/groups must submit a Travel Approval Request Form for: » All trips of three nights or more; » All trips to Savannah with Birthplace reservations regardless of duration; » International trips and cruises; » All trips that include high risk activities (see “High Risk Activities” on page 114). 
    Page 114

    How do you know if the trip is approved?
    Page 117

    Troops that wish to camp on sites not operated by the council should fill out a Travel Approval Request Form and submit it to the council for approval at least one month prior to the requested date.
    Page 125

  • Law - Georgia State Law

    Insist that everyone is in a legal seat and wears her seat belt at all times, and adhere to state laws regarding booster seats and requirements for children in rear seats.
    Page 19

    Georgia First Offenders Act*** applies to a particular situation. 
    Page 25

    If a current Girl Scout volunteer is charged with or convicted of, pled guilty to, received deferred adjudication for, or pled no contest to, certain crimes in the Grounds for Dismissal list (see below), unless GSGATL learns or is advised that the Georgia First Offenders act applies to a particular situation. 
    Page 27

    Under Georgia law, directors and officers of nonprofits enjoy limited protection from liability, as do an organization’s volunteers.
    Page 30

    Georgia law requires that actual or suspected child abuse or neglect be reported within 24 hours of the event giving rise to the reporting obligation. ...



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  • Service Unit - Social Media

    When forming a troop/service unit Facebook, Twitter account, Web site or other form of social media you must have a GSGATL approved volunteer/adult member as part of your group and the group must follow the Computer/Online Use: Safety Activity Checkpoint. Page 41

  • Paddleboarding

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. » Paddleboarding. 
    Page 114

    Check out Pine Acres where girls can hone their skills while sailing, paddleboarding, or kayaking on beautiful Lake Allatoona. 
    Page 123

  • Internet Safety

    When forming a troop/service unit Facebook, Twitter account, Web site or other form of social media you must have a GSGATL approved volunteer/adult member as part of your group and the group must follow the Computer/Online Use: Safety Activity Checkpoint. 
    Page 41

     To ensure the girls’ safety: » Use girls’ first names only.
    Page 87

     All girls and parents who choose to participate in the online program are strongly encouraged to observe all precautions for internet safety and must only use the software programs associated with the GSUSA approved vendors to execute online activities.
    Page 105

     But first, please keep in mind that girls: » Must sign the Girl Scout Internet Safety Pledge (available at www.girlscouts.org/help/internet_safety_pledge. asp) before doing any online activities, and all online activities must be under the supervision of adults. 
    Page 106

  • Open Communication

    Help girls see how open communication can result in action, discovery, better understanding of self and others, and a more comfortable climate for fun and accomplishment. Page 75

  • Kayaking

    Kayaks - JR CD SR AM - Must be comfortable swimming in deep water.
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities...» Kayaking.
    Page 114

    Water Enthusiasts: Check out Pine Acres where girls can hone their skills while sailing, paddleboarding, or kayaking on beautiful Lake Allatoona. 
    Page 123

  • Journeys - Adult Assistance

    A parent/guardian meeting, or a meeting of your friends-and-family network (as encouraged in many of the leadership Journeys), is a chance for you to get to know the families of the girls in your group. GSGATL’s Volunteer’s Guide to Girl Scouting has resources to help you plan your parent/guardian meeting. 
    Page 79

    And feel free to use the sample welcome letter and friends/family checklist in the Girl Scout Daisy, Brownie, and Junior Leadership Journeys to assist you in expanding your troop’s adult network. 
    Page 132

  • Insurance - Non-Members

    Information about the plan for non-members is automatically sent to event directors who have successfully completed the approval process related to Beyond the Troop Events. Page 93

  • Patches

    When needing large quantities (more than 48 badges, fun patches, more than six of anything else such as gift items and clothing items except sashes and vests), please call and place your order at least three weeks in advance in order to ensure that we will have sufficient stock to meet your needs.
    Page 12

    In addition to the leadership awards tied to the Journeys and the National Proficiency badges, girls can show they belong by adding emblems to the front of their vests or sashes and participation patches on the back. 
    Page 58

    Also, see “Patches” and “Council’s Own badges,” below.
    Page 139

    Patches are cloth award emblems; some are official, but many are not!
    Page 140

  • Health Histories

    Although volunteers should keep girls’ health histories handy at all times, the health documentation of co-volunteers should never be privy to other volunteers. All volunteer health histories must be kept confidential. 
    Page 42

    Health Histories (Including Examinations and Immunizations). 
    Page 91

  • Reservations - Camping

    Complete the troop camping reservation form on or after the following dates: • Fall/Winter - Mail applications on or after April 1 for September-February camp dates. Page 130

  • Paddleboarding

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. » Paddleboarding. 
    Page 114

    Check out Pine Acres where girls can hone their skills while sailing, paddleboarding, or kayaking on beautiful Lake Allatoona. 
    Page 123

  • Reservations - Camping

    Complete the troop camping reservation form on or after the following dates: • Fall/Winter - Mail applications on or after April 1 for September-February camp dates. Page 130

  • Rental Vehicle

    If renting or chartering a vehicle for a trip, please allow at least two weeks for GSGATL approval. Page 88

  • Lime Green Giraffe

    Lime Green Giraffe – this creative girl committee writes and produces our exciting Lime Green Giraffe online e-zine. Page 59 

  • Money-Earning - Procedures

    Product programs are a great way to earn the funds necessary for girls to travel or carry out Take Action projects.  Page 107

  • Town Meeting

    Under the town meeting system, business is discussed and decisions are made at meetings attended by all the girls in the troop. Page 135

  • Meriwether

    South Region: Butts, Coweta, Fayette, Henry, Heard, Meriwether, Lamar, Newton, Pike, Rockdale, Spalding, Troup and Upson.
    Page 10

    Resident camping is available at five of our council’s camps: Pine Valley, Pine Acres, Timber Ridge, Meriwether and Misty Mountain.
    Page 123

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, Inc. operates five camps – Meriwether, Misty Mountain, Pine Acres, Pine Valley and Timber Ridge.
    Page 124

    Meriwether 
    Page 125

  • Neglect

    Follow GSGATL guidelines for reporting concerns about abuse or neglect that may be occurring inside or outside of Girl Scouting in Procedure 22A on page 34.
    Page 19

    Although there are many formal and acceptable definitions of child abuse, the following is offered as a guide on child abuse and neglect. 
    Page 34

    GSGATL may release a volunteer who has been charged with child abuse or neglect pending resolution of the charge.
    Page 36

    If a girl tells you she is being abused, or if you suspect abuse or neglect, you must report it.
    Page 78

    Follow your council’s guidelines as well as state laws for reporting concerns about abuse or neglect that may be occurring inside or outside of Girl Scouting.
    Page 85 

  • Journeys - Introducing to Girls

    Introduce the Journey, its theme, and its ties to leadership. Page 16

  • Intruder

    Unauthorized Person on Site (Intruder). Page 95

  • Juliettes - Contact

    Individual Girl Scouts/Juliettes . . . . . . . . 770-702-9150. Page ii

  • Membership - Forms

    Processing and completing registration forms and other paperwork, such as Membership Registration Forms (paper forms are used when applying for financial assistance, paying with Cookie Dough, or when graduating seniors are purchasing a Lifetime Membership), permission slips, event applications, and troop financial reports to be shared with parents/guardians.
    Page 21

    Forms. 
    Page 141

  • Powerboat Inner Tube

    Powerboat Inner Tube - JR CD SR AM - Must be comfortable swimming in deep water. Page 92

  • Safety - Guidelines

    Every adult in Girl Scouting is responsible for the physical and emotional safety of girls, and we all demonstrate that by agreeing to follow these guidelines at all times. Page 19

  • Safe Space

    Adults are responsible for making Girl Scouting a place where girls are as safe emotionally as they are physically. 
    Page 19

    A safe space is one in which girls feel as though they can be themselves, without explanation, judgment, or ridicule. 
    Page 74

    Adults are responsible for making Girl Scouting a place where girls are as safe emotionally as they are physically. 
    Page 86

    As you ask for chaperones, be sure to look for ones who are committed to: Creating a safe space for girls.
    Page 117

  • Incident Management

    All accidents/incidents requiring treatment beyond basic first aid must be reported to GSGATL’s Risk Management at 770-702-9167.
    Page 32

  • Scuba

    Scuba - Restricted - Age 12 & above.
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. » Scuba Diving.
    Page 114

  • Money Earning - For Take Action Projects

    Take Action projects are projects conducted to complete a Girl Scout Journey or one of Girl Scouts’ Highest Awards (Gold, Silver and Bronze). Page 40

  • Money-Earning - Treats and Keeps

    Girls earn money in two distinct ways: » The Girl Scout Cookie Program and the Girl Scout Treats and Keeps Progam, organized by GSGATL and open to all Girl Scouts. Page 102

  • Male - And Travel

    Approved male volunteers must be accompanied in the vehicle by an unrelated female volunteer who does not share the same household.
    Page 19

    When transporting girls to or from an activity, approved male volunteers must be accompanied in the vehicle by an unrelated female volunteer who does not share the same household.
    Page 26

    Approved male volunteers must be accompanied in the vehicle by an unrelated female volunteer who does not share the same household.
    Page 85

    Approved male volunteers must be accompanied in the vehicle by an unrelated female volunteer who does not share the same household.
    Page 87

    Approved male volunteers must be accompanied in the vehicle by an unrelated female volunteer who does not share the same household.
    Page 88

  • Juliette Low World Friendship Fund

    To honor Juliette Gordon Low’s love of travel, of experiencing different cultures, and of making friends, Girl Scouts created the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund in 1927. Page 112

  • Service Unit - Money-Earning

    Money-earning refers to activities troops and service units engage in to earn revenue that directly supports the troop or service unit. Page 39 

  • Loading and Unloading Passengers

    Load and unload in areas that are free from vehicular traffic unless there is an emergency. Page 89

  • Togetherthere

    That’s why we’ve launched ToGetHerThere, the largest fundraising campaign for girls in history.
    Page 8

    In 2012, its centennial year, Girl Scouts launched ToGetHerThere, the boldest advocacy and fundraising cause campaign dedicated to girls’ leadership issues in the nation’s history.
    Page 45

  • Sensitive Issues

    Some of these issues may be considered “sensitive” by parents, and they may have opinions or input about how, and whether, Girl Scouts should cover these topics should be covered with their daughters. Page 77

  • Highest Award

    The Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are Girl Scouting’s highest awards. Page 58

  • Rededication

    Rededication ceremonies are opportunities for girls and adults to renew their commitment to the Girl Scout Promise and Law.
    Page 60

    Rededication is a ceremony where reregistering Girl Scouts renew their Promise.
    Page 140

     

  • Horseback Riding

    Horseback Riding – ring DA BR JR CD SR AM - Restrictions for Daisies & Brownies.  Venue must be pre-approved by GSGATL. 
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. Horseback Activities.
    Page 114

    Both Misty Mountain and Meriwether offer horseback riding programs. 
    Page 123

    In addition to an Activity Permission Volunteer Essentials — Chapter 8: Camping – Taking Leadership to the Outdoors 127 form, girls need a Health History form signed by their parent or guardian for troop camping, water sports, horseback riding, skiing, hiking, non-contact sports, or other physically demanding sports. 
    Page 128

  • Troop - Members

    Since funds belong to the troop or group as a whole, and never to individual members, when a new member joins she benefits from those funds equally with the other members. Page 100

  • Service Unit - Contact

    General Questions/ Service Unit Information . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9110
    Page ii

     

  • In-Kind Donations

    In-kind donations may be solicited by adult volunteers on behalf of the Take Action project team. 
    Page 40

    Service units, troops, and adult individuals acting on behalf of any Girl Scout group, must have permission from GSGATL’s Fund Development Department before contacting any organization, business, corporation, or foundation for financial support or in-kind donations. 
    Page 108

    Should additional resources be needed, in-kind donations of goods and services may be solicited by adult volunteers. 
    Page 109

  • Local Trips

    FOR LOCAL TRIPS LASTING SIX HOURS OR LESS, WITH A TRAVEL TIME OF LESS THAN ONE HOUR (one way): GSGATL requires that ALL drivers of Girl Scouts be at least 18 years old AND have a clear driving record. 
    Page 87

    Girl Scout Daisies Start out with short, local trips of several hours duration. 
    Page 116

  • Safety

    In Girl Scouting, the emotional and physical safety and well-being of girls is always a top priority.  Page 85

  • Placement

    There shall be no discrimination in the recruitment, selection, placement, training, retention, and recognition of adult volunteers regardless of race, color, religion, ethnicity, age, socio-economic status, disability or national origin.
    Page 23

    Every attempt will be made to place volunteers in positions that meet both their needs and the needs of GSGATL.
    Page 26

  • Photography

    Respect other’s privacy and your own personal boundaries by using discretion when posting photos, comments, etc. Page 42

  • Pontoon Boat

    Pine Acres - Pontoon Pull on the Lake. Page 123

  • High Risk Activities

    Volunteers may not enter into any contract or agreement that involves an expenditure of more than $500, services that involve the transportation of girls, or the involvement of girls in high risk activities as defined in this document, without GSGATL approval.
    Page 37

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities.
    Page 114

  • Journeys - By Program Level

    Currently there are three Journey series available at each program level. Page 47

  • Senior - Travel

    Not only do some of the most memorable moments in a Girl Scout’s life happen while taking trips, but travel also offers a wealth of opportunities for girls to develop leadership skills.
    Page 112

    Girl Scout Getaways and Guide/Scout Jamborees: Troop travel also includes national Getaways and international Jamborees, which range from two days to three weeks and are for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors. 
    Page 113

    Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors & Ambassadors Day travel is unlimited. Travel is unlimited in the continental United States. 
    Page 116

    If a Girl Scout Cadette, Senior, or Ambassador will be traveling alone during any part of a trip, use the opportunity to help her feel comfortable with and capable of being on her own. Always talk first with her parents to assess her maturity and ability to handle herself, and have them complete an emergency form. 
    Page 119

  • Opening A Bank Account

    Girl Scout troops and groups are encouraged to open a troop checking account when the amount of funds on hand reaches $100.00 or meets the minimum requirements of the chosen bank. Page 99

  • Troop Meeting - Activity

    Activities will depend on what the girls want to do in their troop and how they want to spend their collective time. Outdoor time is important, so encourage the girls to hold an activity at a park or forest. Page 134

  • Treats and Keeps - Social Media

    For both programs, girls and parents may use social media as approved by a parent to promote a link to their storefront. 
    Page 105

    The following sections detail how girls can use electronic marketing, social media, and group Web sites to gather sale commitments from family, friends, and previous customers. 
    Page 106

  • Registered Members. See also Membership

    All adult volunteers, except those adults serving as temporary advisors or consultants, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement and must pay the applicable membership dues on an annual basis and meet GSUSA membership requirements. 
    Page 23

    Parent helpers must become registered members and are required to complete the volunteer approval process, which includes completing the volunteer application and consenting to a criminal background check. 
    Page 24

    All currently registered members of GSUSA are automatically covered by a supplemental activity accident insurance policy. 
    Page 30

    A portion of the individual annual membership dues pays for supplementary insurance for the member only.
    Page 91

  • Insurance

    All currently registered members of GSUSA are automatically covered by a supplemental activity accident insurance policy. 
    Page 30

    A portion of the individual annual membership dues pays for supplementary insurance for the member only.

    Page 91

    Registered members are covered by Girl Scout Activity Accident Insurance and are entitled to wear the Girl Scout pins, uniforms, and official casual wear, etc. Being a registered member of Girl Scouts is not the same as being an approved volunteer; see Approved Volunteer, above. 
    Page 140

  • Service Centers - Contact

    Mableton (Service Center) . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9100. Page ii

  • Matching Gifts

    Volunteer Service Grants or Matching Gifts from your employer are considered grants to support Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta as a 501(c)(3). Page 109

  • Training - For Trips and Events

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Trip Planning Matrix. 
    Page 115 

    The adult event director takes training called Planning Events Beyond the Troop with Emergency Preparedness. (Event directors who have taken the training prior to December 2013 must take the online supplemental training Emergency Preparedness.)
    Page 122

    Refer to “Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Trip Planning Matrix” on page 115 for more information about the appropriate training and approval procedures for camping trips.
    Page 125

  • Troop - Government

    Many troops employ a democratic system of governance so that all members have the opportunity to express their interests and feelings and share in the planning and coordination of activities. Page 134

  • Motor Bikes

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher.  Page 92

  • Travel - Planning Matrix

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Trip Planning Matrix. Page 115

  • Service Unit

    As a volunteer, you will have the most contact with your Girl Scout support team, called a service unit.
    Page 13

    Service Unit: a smaller geographic area of our council, usually defined by school districts.
    Page 140

  • Membership - Financial Assistance

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities.  Page 101

  • Resource Centers

    Resource Centers are your Girl Scout libraries: the Mableton, Dalton and Griffin Service Centers/Offices have a resource room where volunteers may check out books, videos, activity kits, flags, and other materials whenever the center is open. Page 14

  • Parachuting

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher. Page 92

  • Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace

    All trips involving high risk activities, trips to the Birthplace in Savannah, extended trips (three nights or more), cruises, and international travel require written council permission in advance of the trip. 
    Page 114

    The Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace in Savannah, Georgia, is a fantastic place for Girl Scout Juniors and older to visit.
    Page 116

  • North Region

    North Region: Bartow, Cherokee, Floyd, Gilmer, Gordon, Fannin, Murray, Pickens, Whitfield and Polk, TN. Page 10

  • Safety - Parent/Guardian Responsibilities

    You want to engage each parent or guardian to help you work toward ensuring the health, safety, and well-being of girls. Page 86

  • Junior - Awards

    The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting also has the requirements for the Safety Award at each program level, the bridging award at each level, and requirements for the Girl Scout Bronze (Junior), Silver (Cadette), and Gold (Senior, Ambassador) awards. 
    Page 51

    As a Girl Scout volunteer, encourage girls to go for it by earning these awards at the Junior through Ambassador levels. 
    Page 58

  • Pine Valley

    Resident camping is available at five of our council’s camps: Pine Valley, Pine Acres, Timber Ridge, Meriwether and Misty Mountain.
    Page 123

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, Inc. operates five camps – Meriwether, Misty Mountain, Pine Acres, Pine Valley and Timber Ridge
    Page 124

    Pine Valley
    Page 125

     

  • Scholarships

    All rewards earned by girls through the productsale activities must support Girl Scout program experiences (such as camp, travel, and program events, but not scholarships or financial credits toward outside organizations). 
    Page 102

    On average, for each box of Girl Scout Cookies sold: 54% is returned to leaders and girls in program opportunities, maintenance of 5 camp properties covering 2400 acres, insurance, program supplies, financial assistance, training, background checks, regional service centers and Girl Scout Badge & Sash Stores, $52,000 in scholarships for higher education and the Web site for up-to-date events, information and training and other business operations. 
    Page 103

    Financial aid, scholarships: financial assistance is available for girls whose family cannot afford the annual national membership dues or basics such as Girl Scout and World Trefoil pins, a uniform sash and the Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting or a Leadership Journey book. Application forms are available online or from your membership specialist.  Page 139...



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  • Role Model

    Your most important role as a Girl Scout volunteer is to be excited about everything this opportunity affords you: a chance to help girls succeed, play a critical role in their lives, and watch them blossom! 
    Page 20

    GSGATL may release any volunteer who, in conducting the Girl Scout program, advocates, solicits, or promotes a personal lifestyle so as to create a substantial risk that such conduct will be detrimental to being a proper role model for girl members.
    Page 27

    Part of being an effective and responsible Girl Scout adult volunteer includes being an appropriate role model.
    Page 33

    As you ask for chaperones, be sure to look for ones who are committed to: » Being a positive role model.
    Page 117

    Adults supervise by...being a role model by your actions.
    Page 126

  • Passengers

    Passengers should be instructed in the following safety procedures prior to transporting: » Passengers should remain seated at all times with hands and arms inside vehicle. Page 89

  • Senior -Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls.  Page 18

  • Troop Management

    Membership can be verified by “01” volunteers through the Troop Management function in eBiz.
    Page 23

    Troop volunteers registered as “01” troop leaders (one per troop) have access to the eBiz Troop Management module, a system that allows them to register all members of their troop in one payment as well as update troop meeting details and member contact information. 
    Page 81

  • Mission

    At Girl Scouts, our mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.
    Page 5

    Reasons for release may include, but are not limited to, elimination of the position in which the volunteer serves, failure to abide by policies and standards of GSUSA or GSGATL, refusal to accept and foster the Girl Scout mission and values, or membership in an organization whose goals are not compatible with those of GSUSA.
    Page 27

    Monies may be: Donated to a local charity whose mission is in keeping with Girl Scout principles.
    Page 101

    The girls can do the following: Donated to a local charity whose mission is in keeping with Girl Scout principles.
    Page 137

  • Trips - Permission

    Before most trips, you will need to obtain council permission, although GSGATL may not require this information for trips of one day with no overnight stay.  Page 114

     

  • Private Benefit

    Per the IRS, “a section 501(c)(3) organization must not be organized or operated for the benefit of private interests. No part of the net earnings of a section 501(c)(3) organization may inure to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual.” Page 44

  • Treats and Keeps

    As Juliettes, girl members: May take part in the council Girl Scout Cookie and Treats and Keeps programs. Page 10

  • Religious Organization - My Promise, My Faith

    The Girl Scout Law includes many of the principles and values common to most faiths.  Page 51

  • Recognition - Volunteer Recognition

    GSGATL believes every volunteer should be recognized for his or her contributions to building girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place. GSGATL’s volunteer recognition program is designed to offer formal and informal recognition. 
    Page 22

    GSGATL, in recognition of its responsibility to its volunteers, its staff, and the girls it serves, and in keeping with Girl Scouts of the USA’s (GSUSA) emphasis on pluralism, reaffirms its policy to ensure fair and equal treatment in all its practices to all persons, regardless of race, color, religion, ethnicity, age, socio-economic status, disability or national origin.
    Page 23

    Benefits and services to volunteers may include training and other learning opportunities, support from GSGATL staff and other council volunteers, GSUSA and GSGATL publications and Web site, tools for recording volunteer experiences, awards and recognitions, and performance evaluations. 
    Page 30

    GSGATL’s volunteer recognition program is designed to be a valuable component of the volunteer support sy...



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  • Safety Award

    The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting also has the requirements for the Safety Award at each program level, the bridging award at each level, and requirements for the Girl Scout Bronze (Junior), Silver (Cadette), and Gold (Senior, Ambassador) awards. Page 51

  • Reservations - Birthplace

    All trips invloving high risk activities, trips to the Birthplace in Savannah, extended trips (three nights or more), cruises, and international travel require written council permission in advance of the trip. Page 114

  • Money Management

    Helping girls decide what they want to do, and coaching them as they earn and manage money to pursue their goals, is an integral part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE). Your Girl Scout group plans and finances its own activities, with your guidance. 
    Page 98

    Money management – Girls who learn to handle orders, inventory, and customer’s money grow to manage their own allowance, income from a part-time job while still in school, a checking account or their own cell phone bill! 
    Page 103

  • Troop - Finances

    Troops are accountable for troop income and expenses and must submit finance reports to the troop parents, service unit and to the Council. 
    Page 37

    To ensure council compliance with IRS regulations and to protect the council’s 501(c) (3) tax exempt status with the IRS, GSGATL does not allow troops or other pathways to create reserve funds or earmark funds or financial disbursement for individual girls. 
    Page 44

    Troop leaders are required to submit a troop finance report form to the girls’ parents or guardians two times a year.
    Page 99

    A final Troop Finance report should be completed. 
    Page 138

  • Journeys - Planning

    Journeys for older girls include planning pages specifically designed to help them customize their Journey. Page 15

  • Transporting Girls

    How parents decide to transport girls between their homes and Girl Scout meeting places is each parent’s individual decision and responsibility. Page 87

  • Learning Opportunities

    Taking Advantage of Learning Opportunities. 
    Page 21

    Refer to Learning Opportunities, to the Training section of GSGATL’s Web site, [www.gsgatl.org/volunteeressentials/training] or contact the appropriate service team volunteer or council staff member for information regarding training courses.
    Page 31

    Each year, GSGATL provides learning opportunities on the procedures to follow during each sale. 
    Page 103

    Learning Opps, Learning Opportunities, are the in-person and online classes, workshops and webinars offered by Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, most at no cost.
    Page 140

  • Non-Member Insurance

    Non-member insurance is not available for individual troop activities. Page 93

  • Sample Troop Year

    Here is just one example of how you and the girls could set up your troop year: » Hold a parent/guardian meeting. Page 136

     

  • Inner Tube

    Powerboat Inner Tube - JR CD SR AM - Must be comfortable swimming in deep water. Page 92

  • Building Trust

    Show girls you trust them to think for themselves and use their own judgment. Page 75

  • Finance Reports - Troop Finance Report Form

    Troop Finance Report Submit this form annually to your service unit director. » www.gsgatl.org/volunteer-essentials/troop-finance-report. Page 141

  • Camping - Primitive

    Primitive Camping – pitch your own tent. Page 125

  • Daisy - Daisy Pin

    Investiture-This ceremony welcomes new members, girls or adults, into the Girl Scout family for the first time. Girls receive their Girl Scout, Brownie Girl Scout, or Daisy Girl Scout pin and their World Trefoil pin at this time. Page 60

  • Bicycles

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles. Page 92

  • Giant Swing

    Giant Swing. Page 123

  • Camping - Private Campsites

    Troops that wish to camp on sites not operated by the council should fill out a Travel Approval Request Form and submit it to the council for approval at least one month prior to the requested date. Page 125

  • Bank Accounts

    If your group is earning and spending money, the group needs to set up a bank account.
    Page 98

    In all cases, if a donation is made, a check should be written directly to the receiving troop.
    Page 101

  • Girl Scout Leadership Experience - National Program Portfolio

    We strongly recommend that each girl has her own books from the National Program Portfolio. Page 46

  • Day Camp

    Day Camp is available for girls entering kindergarten and older. Page 124

  • Canoeing

    Non-swimmers must be paired with an adult.
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. 
    Page 114

    All of the camps offer the traditional camp experiences girls know and love, including archery, canoeing, arts and crafts and outdoor skills. In addition, several camps offer the following specialty activities.
    Page 123

  • Girl Scout Law - My Promise, My Faith

    Girls of all grade levels can now earn the My Promise, My Faith pin.

  • eBiz - Events

    eBiz is a web-based system hosted by GSUSA that allows for members to purchase their GSUSA membership online, register for events and enroll in GSGATL-sponsored learning opportunities. Page 81

  • Emergencies - Emergency Contact Information

     Phone: 770-702-9100 or 800- 771-4046. After hours, please call: 888-644-0511. Page 97

  • Cookie Program - Camp Discount

    Girls who participate in the Girl Scout Cookie Program receive a discounted rate for attending one of our council resident camps. Page 123

  • Dues - Girl Responsibility

    At the Daisy and Brownie level, girls may collect and record dues, but the troop volunteer handles money and keeps financial records; she or he does all troop budgeting, but explains the process to girls and gets their input on activities and purchases.
    Page 100

    The group volunteer handles money, keeps financial records, and shares some of the group-budgeting responsibilities.
    Page 110

    Girl collects dues, if brought to troop meetings; adds up total (with adult help if needed) and reports to rest of troop during business portion of troop meeting.
    Page 135

  • Criminal Conduct

    Factors that may be considered in making such determinations include, but are not limited to, the nature and severity of the criminal conduct, length of time since the criminal conduct occurred, and the tasks associated with the desired volunteer position. Page 25

  • Finance Reports - Procedures

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta’s Procedures for Managing Troop Accounts.
    Page 99

    At the Daisy and Brownie level, girls may collect and record dues, but the troop volunteer handles money and keeps financial records; she or he does all troop budgeting, but explains the process to girls and gets their input on activities and purchases.
    Page 100

    A final Troop Finance report should be completed.
    Page 138 

  • Day Trips - Approval

    The troop leader is responsible for ensuring that all safety guidelines are followed for day trips taken by the troop, and that all accompanying adults are approved volunteers and registered members. Page 117

  • Girl-led - Events

    Ideas for girl-led events with family, friends, and community experts are also available in the Leadership Journey adult guides! Page 61

  • Camping - State Parks

    In addition to GSGATL’s five council camps, Girl Scouts may camp on other Girl Scout council campsites, or other youth agency camps; in state parks or national forests; or private campsites. Page 125

  • Ambassador - Awards

    Once a girl checks the Awards Log in The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting to make sure there’s not already a badge on the topic she wants to explore, she’ll follow steps outlined in her handbook to complete the requirements for her very own badge.
    Page 51

    In addition to the leadership awards tied to the Journeys and the National Proficiency badges, girls can show they belong by adding emblems to the front of their vests or sashes and participation patches on the back.
    Page 58
     

  • Annual Fund - Online Donations

    That families are encouraged to make a donation to Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta’s Annual Fund, for the benefit of their daughter and all the girls we serve in the greater Atlanta area. Page 81

  • Camporee

    A tea party for your service unit’s Daisy troops, a father-daughter dance for all Girl Scouts in your town, and an overnight service unit camporee are all examples of girl-led Beyond the Troop Events. Page 121

  • Day Camp - Financial Assistance

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities. Page 101

  • Camping - Girl Readiness

    When is a girl ready for a day trip or one-night overnight at an indoor facility with kitchen and bathrooms? Page 125

  • Fencing

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. Page 114

  • eBiz - Contact

    Online Registration Hotline/eBiz . . . . . 770-702-9650 or ebiz@gsgatl.org 
    Page ii

    eBiz is a web-based system hosted by GSUSA that allows for members to purchase their GSUSA membership online, register for events and enroll in GSGATL-sponsored learning opportunities. eBiz allows for fast, convenient, and real-time collection of member information and payment of registration dues. 
    Page 81

  • Flying Squirrel

    Flying Squirrel. Page 123

  • Experts

    The Safety Activity Checkpoints for most activities require having an expert on hand to help girls learn an activity. 

  • Facilities - For Events

    Are there adequate facilities for the audience?
    Page 61

    Are there adequate facilities for the audience? 
    Page 122

  • Dues - Online Payment

    eBiz is a web-based system hosted by GSUSA that allows for members to purchase their GSUSA membership online, register for events and enroll in GSGATL-sponsored learning opportunities. eBiz allows for fast, convenient, and real-time collection of member information and payment of registration dues. Page 81

  • Journeys

    This Journey gives Girl Scout Ambassadors a way to be that someone—an advocate with the power to start the first flutter of real and lasting change. Page 50

  • eBiz - Membership Registration

    Ensuring all participants become registered members of Girl Scouts of the USA by paying annual membership dues using eBiz, a web-based online registration system hosted by GSUSA.
    Page 21

    eBiz is a web-based system hosted by GSUSA that allows for members to purchase their GSUSA membership online, register for events and enroll in GSGATL-sponsored learning opportunities.
    Page 81

  • Funds - See also Annual Fund - Adult Responsibility

    Adults who interact directly with girls or who handle troop/group funds must be at least 18 years old, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement, and must be an approved volunteer with a criminal background check on record that dates back no further than three years.
    Page 21

    Helping girls decide what they want to do, and coaching them as they earn and manage money to pursue their goals, is an integral part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE).
    Page 98

    Identify two or more adults who will be responsible for the funds.
    Page 99

    Only approved volunteers may work directly with girls or handle troop or service unit funds. 
    Page 139

  • Cookie Booth

    Cookie booths, or temporary sales set-ups in areas with lots of foot traffic, are a popular way for girls to sell cookies as a team. Page 105

  • Daisy - Finances

    At the Daisy and Brownie level, girls may collect and record dues, but the troop volunteer handles money and keeps financial records; she or he does all troop budgeting, but explains the process to girls and gets their input on activities and purchases. 
    Page 100

    The group volunteer handles money, keeps financial records, and does all group budgeting.
    Page 110

  • Events - Event Approval

    Any event that will last more than three consecutive days does not fall under these guidelines and requires contacting Risk Management for further direction prior to any planning or incurring any expenses. Page 122

  • Camping - With Daisies

    Girl Scout Daisy camping experiences can include: » An overnight troop camping experience once the troop has completed a full year together and has successfully completed a variety of day trips. Page 125

  • Council's Own Badges

    Council’s Own badges are council-created national awards that provide a unique, local opportunity that girls cannot experience anywhere else. Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta’s “Own” badges for Brownies and Juniors may be downloaded from the Volunteer Resource Library. Page 139

  • Fees - Assistance For

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities. Page 101

  • Ambassador - Uniform

    The official Girl Scout uniform for girls is a white shirt (either their own or the official Girl Scout polo shirt for their program level), their own khaki pants or skirt, and the official program level tunic, vest, or sash.
    Page 32

    Uniforms have been a Girl Scout tradition since 1912, where the first uniforms offered girls and adults freedom of movement and helped cover social and economic class differences. 
    Page 62

    Girl Scout Ambassador Sash & Vest. 
    Page 68

  • Facebook

    When forming a troop/service unit Facebook, Twitter account, Web site or other form of social media you must have a GSGATL approved volunteer/adult member as part of your group and the group must follow the Computer/Online Use: Safety Activity Checkpoint.
    Page 41

    Girls can market cookies and other products by posting on social media sites like Facebook or Twitter or sending emails to friends, family members, and former customers, as long as they use a group email address, the account or address of a parent/guardian or adult volunteer, a blind email address (in which the recipients cannot see the sender’s email address), or the online email tools provided by council-sponsored vendors.
    Page 104

    Girls are texting, calling, emailing, Tweeting, and Facebooking—and those are all effective ways that girls 13 and older can promote cookie and other product programs. 
    Page 106

  • Day Trips - At Camp

    ALL adults participating in a camping trip, including day trips, must be at least 18 years old, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement, and must be approved volunteers with a criminal background check on record that dates back no further than three years. Page 130

  • Brownie - Trips

    Day trip (Brownies and older): An all-day visit to a point of historical or natural interest (bringing their own lunch) or a day-long trip to a nearby city (stopping at a restaurant for a meal). Younger girls can select locations and do much of the trip-planning, while never being too far from home.
    Page 112

    Day travel is unlimited. May take overnight troop trips of one or two nights once progressive day trips have been successfully completed.
    Page 116

  • Archery - At Camp

    All of the camps offer the traditional camp experiences girls know and love, including archery, canoeing, arts and crafts and outdoor skills.
    Page 123

    In addition to GSGATL’s five council camps, Girl Scouts may camp on other Girl Scout council campsites, or other youth agency camps; in state parks or national forests; or private campsites.
    Page 125

  • All-terrain vehicles

    Activities not permitted for program at any age level

  • Fire

    Determine the extent and location of the fire. Page 25

  • Daisy - Petals and Leaves

    If you’re working with Girl Scout Daisies, please note that they earn Petals and Leaves (which form a flower) instead of badges.  Page 50

  • Camping - Leave No Trace

    Leave No Trace Principles for Girls » Know Before You Go (plan ahead and prepare) » Choose The Right Path » Trash Your Trash » Leave What You Find » Be Careful With Fire » Respect Wildlife » Be Kind To Other Visitors. Page 130

  • Camping - Camping Pathway

    In an effort to make the Troop Pathway to Girl Scouts fun for girls, easier for leaders, and still meet the goals set by Girl Scouts of the USA, Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta has established a minimum troop size for new troops by program level. 
    Page 9

    If you find that a troop isn’t available for these girls, work with your membership specialist to find other options—camp, series, event, and travel pathways for example!
    Page 137

  • Advocating for Girls

    The Girl Scouts Public Policy and Advocacy Office in Washington, D.C., builds relationships with members of Congress, White House officials, and other federal departments and agencies, continuously informing and educating them about issues important to girls and Girl Scouting.

  • Friends Asking Friends

    Friends Asking Friends is a fun and easy tool troops and service units can utilize to raise funds toward their Annual Fund goals. Page 13

  • Cookie Program - Planning

    One way to start planning your time with girls, visit www.girlscouts.org/MyCalendar. 
    Page 15

    Have the girls brainstorm and plan any trip or event. 
    Page 136

  • Camping - Day Camp

    Day Camp is available for girls entering kindergarten and older. Page 124

  • Bronze Award

    Girl Scout Bronze (or Silver or Gold) Award ceremonies honor Girl Scout Juniors who have earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award (Cadettes who have earned the Silver Award. Page 60

  • Cookie Program

    In addition to giving girls an opportunity to earn money to fund their Girl Scouting goals, taking part in the Girl Scout Cookie Program teaches girls five important skills that serve them throughout their lives: goal setting, money management, people skills, decision making, and business ethics.
    Page 51

    The Girl Scout Cookie Program and the Girl Scout Treats and Keeps Progam, organized by GSGATL and open to all Girl Scouts. 
    Page 102-111

  • Camping - Safety and Security

    Before going on any trip in the outdoors, become familiar with the security and safety guidelines in this manual, and, of course, in the Safety Activity Checkpoints. Page 127

  • Camping

    Whether they spend an afternoon exploring a local hiking trail or a week at camp, being outside gives girls an opportunity to grow, explore, and have fun in a whole new environment.
    Page 51

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. 
    Page 114

    Camping is a great way for girls to explore leadership, build skills and confidence, and develop a deep appreciation for nature. 
    Page 123

  • Events - Contacts

    Events – General Information . . . . . . 770-702-9143. Page ii

  • Camping - Minimum Impact

    Respect Wildlife – Quick movements and loud noises are stressful to animals.

  • Fishing

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities: » Fishing (if in the water). Page 114

  • Brownie - Circle/Treehouse

    Daisy/Brownie Circle/Treehouse: While sitting in a circle (sometimes called a ring), girls create a formal group decision-making body. Page 134

  • Fees - Convenience

     Customers may incur a convenience fee for credit card usage and/or shipping charges for delivery of products. Page 106

  • Brownie - Finances

    At the Daisy and Brownie level, girls may collect and record dues, but the troop volunteer handles money and keeps financial records.
    Page 100

    The group volunteer handles money, keeps financial records, and shares some of the group-budgeting responsibilities.
    Page 110

  • Financial Responsibility

    Volunteers with financial responsibility to local troops/groups or to the council will not be reappointed to a position if required financial responsibilities have not been met. Page 27

    If a volunteer has been charged with or convicted of, or has pled guilty to, received a deferred adjudication for, or pled no contest to misdemeanor crimes involving theft, fraud, or forgery, or other crimes of dishonesty in the event that the person is allowed to continue as a volunteer, that person will be restricted from management of Girl Scout money.
    Page 28

    Identify two or more adults who will be responsible for the funds.
    Page 99

  • Getaways

     Troop travel also includes national Getaways and international Jamborees, which range from two days to three weeks and are for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors.  Page 113

  • First Aid - First Aid Kit

    Every vehicle used to transport campers and staff should be equipped with a first aid kit and emergency accessories such as fire extinguisher and reflectors. 
    Page 88

    Adults in charge secure first aid kits and have girls in troop/group count off.
    Page 95

    Your troop’s certified first-aider would be a good person to help girls review safety rules, check out the first aid kit and practice simple first aid.
    Page 127

  • Boating

    Participation in any of these activities requires written permission from GSGATL in advance of the trip.  Page 114

  • Girl Scout Sabbath

    Note that Girl Scout Week begins the Sunday on or before March 12 (a day known as “Girl Scout Sunday”) and extends through the Saturday following March 12 (a day known as “Girl Scout Sabbath”). Page 59

  • Dues - Troop

    Troops may collect dues from troop members. Membership will not be denied based on an inability to pay troop or group dues.
    Page 38

    Girl Scout groups are funded by a share of money earned through council-sponsored product program activities (such as Girl Scout cookie activities), group money-earning activities (council-approved, of course), and any dues your group may charge. 
    Page 98

    Dues typically range from $.50 to $2 per meeting.
    Page 99

    Troop business may include taking attendance, collecting dues, making announcements, and planning an upcoming event or trip.
    Page 133

  • Fishing

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities: » Fishing (if in the water). Page 114

  • Camping - Camp Ranger

    A responsible adult will serve as check-in person to account for the presence of all participants at the safe area. At council camps, this person is the camp ranger.
    Page 96

    If you find you must cancel during the week you are scheduled to camp, call the camp’s ranger directly.
    Page 131

  • Cookie Program - Social Media

    A girl’s physical address, social media page address, IM name, Skype name or number, email address, or cell number should never be revealed to anyone outside her immediate circle of family and friends. 
    Page 104

    The following sections detail how girls can use electronic marketing, social media, and group Web sites to gather sale commitments from family, friends, and previous customers. 
    Page 106

  • Emergency Preparedness

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta requires adult event planners/advisers to complete the Planning Events Beyond the Troop with Emergency Preparedness workshop for events involving more than one troop.
    Page 61

    The adult event director takes training called Planning Events Beyond the Troop with Emergency Preparedness. 
    Page 122

  • Finance Reports - Service Unit

    A year-end financial report with current bank statement should be submitted to the membership specialist by June 15 of each year. Page 101

  • Daisy

    After girls join, they team up in the following grade levels: » Girl Scout Daisy (grades K–1)
    Page 8

    At the Girl Scout Daisy level (kindergarten and first grade), girls . . . This means . . . Have loads of energy and need to run, walk, and play outside. They’ll enjoy going on nature walks and outdoor scavenger hunts. 
    Page 71

  • Gifts

    Many employers offer matching gifts and volunteer service grant opportunities which could double or even triple your support. 
    Page 13

    All other request or use of the form to solicit donations and in-kind gifts must be preapproved by Council.
    Page 100

  • Finance Reports

    Troops are accountable for troop income and expenses and must submit finance reports to the troop parents, service unit and to the Council. Troops should be self-supporting.
    Page 37 

    Troops and service units are accountable for income and expenses and must submit finance reports as indicated in the procedures below. 
    Page 39

    Have a current troop finance report on file with GSGATL.
    Page 107

  • Girl Scouts' Own

    Girl Scouts’ Own is a girl-led ceremony that allows girls to explore their feelings and beliefs around a topic (such as the importance of friendship or the personal meaning they get from the Girl Scout Promise and Law) using spoken word, favorite songs, poetry, or other methods of expression. Page 60

  • Events - Event Volunteers

    There’s a good chance you’ve already logged on to watch Girl Scouting 101 or Volunteering for Girl Scout Series and Events, our self-paced, online orientations to Girl Scouting.
    Page 22

    Volunteers for short-term or one-time events sponsored by GSGATL are considered temporary assistants and annual membership dues are optional. 
    Page 23

  • Brownie - Journeys

    Through the Journey’s many adventures, anecdotes, and activities, the Brownies follow through on clues and enjoy a fun and challenging Girl Scout experience that strengthens their confidence and gives them a chance to better the world. Page 48

  • Catalog

    Online Shopping - GSGATL is excited to offer online shopping through our Web site.  
    Page 11

    All GSGATL stores use the same refund policy: all merchandise that is in the current Girl Scout catalog can be exchanged or refunded within 60 days of purchase with the receipt, if tags and/or packing materials are still attached, and if the merchandise has not been used.
    Page 12

  • Activities - not permitted

    Potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher.

  • Curved Bar Award

    The First Class Award existed for only two years, from 1938–1940, and was replaced in 1940 with The Curved Bar Award, the requirements for which were updated in 1947. Page 58

  • Day Trips - Planning

    Trip Planning Matrix. Page 115

  • Daisy - Uniform

    Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies may wear the khaki and white uniform, or they may wear official Girl Scout uniform components for their program level, such as the Daisy or Brownie beanie, shirt, skirt, leggings or other official components. 
    Page 32

    Girl Scout Daisy Tunic & Vest.
    Page 63

  • Confidentiality

    The council reserves the right to deny requests for copies of the situation report based on the need to maintain the confidentiality of sensitive or confidential information.
    Page 29

    All information concerning staff, volunteers, financial data, and business records of Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta is confidential. 
    Page 42

    A safe space is one in which girls feel as though they can be themselves, without explanation, judgment, or ridicule. Girl Scout research shows that girls are looking for an emotionally safe environment, where confidentiality is respected and they can express themselves without fear.
    Page 74

  • Daisy - Activities

    Use guidelines based on the program level of the youngest girl in the troop when considering troop activities. Page 92

  • Conflict of Interest

    A conflict of interest exists when the interests or concerns of any Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta volunteer or any member of his/her immediate family, or any party, group or organization in which said volunteer is actively involved, may be seen as adverse to, or in competition with the interests or concerns of the Council. Page 43

  • Cadette - Activities

    Use guidelines based on the program level of the youngest girl in the troop when considering troop activities.  Page 92

  • Chaperones

    Every chaperone must be at least 18 years old, must be a registered member of the Girl Scout Movement, and must be an approved volunteer with a criminal background check on record that dates back no further than three years. 
    Page 117

    Adult Chaperones and Drivers must: » be at least 18 years old, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement, and must be approved volunteers with a criminal background check on record that dates back no further than three years.
    Page 126

  • Cookie Program - Contact

    Girl Scout Cookie Program . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9144 (E-mail: cookiehelpline@gsgatl.org) 

  • Arrests

    If there is an open warrant for the arrest of the applicant, or there is a pending charge with no disposition, that application cannot be approved and the volunteer cannot be placed until the situation has been satisfactorily resolved and the criminal background check report updated.
    Page 25

    Arrests of current volunteers, and current volunteers who have pled guilty or no contest to certain crimes, or who have been placed on probation or deferred adjudication for crimes that are brought to GSGATL’s attention, will be handled in a similar manner to open warrants and pending charges for prospective volunteers.
    Page 28

  • First Aider

    A first-aider is an adult volunteer who has taken Girl Scout approved first-aid and CPR training that includes specific instructions for child CPR.
    Page 94

    Certified first aider present during the trip.
    Page 115

    An adult trained “Troop camper” and an adult trained and currently certified in first aid are required. 
    Page 125

    Your troop’s certified first-aider would be a good person to help girls review safety rules, check out the first aid kit and practice simple first aid.
    Page 127

    First Aider* – Serves as the required adult first aide...



    Read Full Article ]
  • Girl-led - Travel

    One tool that will help you keep trips girl-led, is to start with simple, close-to-home trips. Page 116

  • Destinations

    Destinations means travel!
    Page 59

    Girl Scout destinations: travel adventures, which range from two days to three weeks, are for individual Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors; they allow girls to travel across America and to the far corners of the Earth! 
    Page 113

  • Daisy - Troop

    Girl Scout Daisy, K–1, Minimum number of girls per troop is 8. Page 9

  • Appointment

    Girl Scout volunteers must be appointed to their position, using the procedures below. It is the responsibility of the prospective volunteer to complete all the required steps. GSGATL reserves the right to limit volunteer involvement until all steps have been completed. Page 26

  • Group Funds

    Adults who interact directly with girls or who handle troop/group funds must be at least 18 years old, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement, and must be an approved volunteer with a criminal background check on record that dates back no further than three years.
    Page 21

    Girl Scout groups are funded by a share of money earned through council-sponsored product program activities (such as Girl Scout cookie activities), group money-earning activities (council-approved, of course), and any dues your group may charge. 
    Page 98

    If there is a discrepancy with the troop/group funds: » The troop leader, assistant leader and adult treasurer will meet to determine the problem and resolve it.
    Page 100

  • Fatalities

    Although you hope the worst never happens, you must observe GSGATL procedures for handling accidents and fatalities. Page 96

  • Cookie Program - Troop Cookie Manager

    Troop Cookie Manager* – Attends service unit Cookie Program training, coordinates the delivery and storage of cookies for the troop, complete Girl Scout Cookie Program reports, and distributes girl rewards. Page 133

  • Camping - Non-Council Campsites

    These sites must meet the guidelines for troop camping in the Safety Activity Checkpoints, located on our Web site, and be approved by the council. Page 125

  • Backing Up - (Driving)

    Because you cannot see everything behind your vehicle, backing up is always dangerous. Page 89

  • Cadette - Journeys

    Life is a maze of relationships and this Journey has Girl Scout Cadettes maneuvering through all its twists and turns to find true friendships, plenty of confidence, and maybe even peace. Girls can make “peacemaker kits,” learn about bullying behavior, and complete a Take Action project that thrives on these relationship skills. Page 49

  • Cookie Program - Rewards

    Girls may earn official Girl Scout grade-appropriate rewards and recognitions related to product program activities. Page 104

  • Camping - Approval

    All adults traveling with the troop are at least 18 years old, are registered members of the Girl Scout Movement, and are approved volunteers with a criminal background check on record that dates back no further than three years. Page 115

  • Emergencies

    Work with girls and other adults to establish and practice procedures for emergencies related to weather, fire, lost girls/adults, and site security. 
    Page 19

    Work with girls and other adults to establish and practice procedures for emergencies related to weather, fire, lost girls/adults, and site security.
    Page 85

    Be familiar enough with what to do in various emergencies (fire, severe storms, etc.) so you and the girls can act quickly and efficiently.
    Page 127

  • Destinations - Financial Assistance

    Financial aid is available to individual members who need assistance with annual membership dues, uniform components, Girl Scout program-level handbooks, and for some events or activities. Page 101

  • Daisy - Journeys

    On this Journey, Girl Scout Daisies join the Flower Friends for a cross-country trip in their special flower-powered car. Page 47

  • Climbing

    Potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher.
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities.
    Page 114

  • Cadette - Camping

    Currently registered Girl Scout Daisy (see special note below), Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior and Ambassador troops trained and accompanied by an adult who has taken council approved outdoor training, (as detailed below) and an adult with a current First Aid/CPR certification are eligible to apply for overnight camping. Page 125

  • Contracts

    Volunteers may not enter into any contract or agreement that involves an expenditure of more than $500, services that involve the transportation of girls, or the involvement of girls in high risk activities as defined in this document, without GSGATL approval. Page 37

  • CPR

    For many activities, Girl Scouts recommends that at least one adult volunteer be first-aid/CPR-certified. Page 93. See also First-Aider

  • Camping - Weekend Camping

    Overnight troop (group) camping, often referred to as “weekend camping” in our council, is available for girls in kindergarten and older, and typically lasts over three consecutive days and two nights. Page 124

  • Child Abuse

    Child abuse consists of any act of commission or omission that endangers or impairs a child’s physical or emotional health and development. 
    Page 34

    Volunteers are expected to establish a no-tolerance policy for abuse or bullying at troop meetings, events, or any Girl Scout activity. 
    Page 35

    GSGATL will release a volunteer who has been convicted of or pleads guilty or no contest to a charge of child abuse or neglect when GSGATL is aware of such conviction or charges. 
    Page 36

    Physical abuse is injury to a child under age 18 by a parent or caretaker which results in bruises, welts, fractures, burns, cuts or internal injuries.
    Page 78

  • Girl-led - Troop Government

    The following are some traditions troops have used for girl-led governance, but these are just examples. Page 134

  • Cognitive Disabilities

    Girls with cognitive disabilities can be registered as closely as possible to their chronological ages. Page 84

  • Ambassador

    At the Girl Scout Ambassador level (eleventh and twelfth grades), girls Can see the complexity of situations and controversial issues, adapt logical thinking to real-life situations, and frequently enjoy expressing their individuality.
    Page 73

    After girls join, they team up in the grade levels.
    Page 89

  • Ambassador - Travel

    Not only do some of the most memorable moments in a Girl Scout’s life happen while taking trips, but travel also offers a wealth of opportunities for girls to develop leadership skills.
    Page 112

    As you help girls choose and plan their trips, be sure they use these Travel Guidelines established for troop and other pathways in Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta: 
    Page 116

    If a Girl Scout Cadette, Senior, or Ambassador will be traveling alone during any part of a trip, use the opportunity to help her feel comfortable with and capable of being on her own.
    Page 119

  • Cadette - Troop

    To organize a troop, you will need: Grades 6–8 and a minimum number of 5 girls.
    Page 9

    Girls and adults participating in troops can meet once a week, once a month, or twice a month for several months—how often is up to you and the girls.
    Page 132

    You help each troop member do her part to ensure the meeting and activities are enriching and fun. 
    Page 134

    Junior/Cadette/Senior/Ambassador Town Meeting: Under the town meeting system, business is discussed and decisions are made at meetings attended by all the girls in the troop.
    Page 135

  • Cookie Program - Permission

    Parents and guardians must grant permission for girls to participate and must be informed about the girls’ whereabouts when they are engaged in product program activities. Page 104

  • Ambassador - Troop

    In an effort to make the Troop Pathway to Girl Scouts fun for girls, easier for leaders, and still meet the goals set by Girl Scouts of the USA, Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta has established a minimum troop size for new troops by program level.
    Page 9

    Activities will depend on what the girls want to do in their troop and how they want to spend their collective time.
    Page 134

  • Cookie Program - Proceeds

    A Girl Scout who decides with her troop how to use troop proceeds grows her confidence to make decisions about spending baby-sitting money or being a leader to resist negative peer pressure. Page 103

  • Donations

    DONATE TODAY to support your Girl Scout’s life-changing experience.
    Page 13

    Families are encouraged to make a donation to Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta’s Annual Fund, for the benefit of their daughter and all the girls we serve in the greater Atlanta area.! 
    Page 81

  • Challenge Course

    Venue must be pre-approved by GSGATL.
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. 
    Page 114

    All of the camps offer the traditional camp experiences girls know and love, including archery, canoeing, arts and crafts and outdoor skills. In addition, several camps offer the following specialty activities.
    Page 123

  • Camping - Camping Events

    Over 40 events are held at council camps each year offering opportunities for troop/weekend camping; day outings and family camping experiences. Page 124

  • Closing Ceremony

    Closing ceremonies finalize the meeting, with expectations for the next. A closing ceremony may be as simple as a hand squeeze while standing in a circle.
    Page 60

    The closing lets the girls know that the troop meeting is ending.
    Page 134

    Girl or small group chooses and/or leads the closing, which could be a Friendship Circle, goodbye song or activity, or the closing activity from the Journey Sample Session.
    Page 135

  • Extended Overnight Trips

    Extended overnight trips (Juniors and older): Three or four nights camping or a stay in a hotel, motel, or hostel within the southeastern United States. Page 112

  • Equestrian Program - See also Horseback Riding

    Maintenance for Camp Facilities and Equestrian Programs.
    Page 13

    Both Misty Mountain and Meriwether offer horseback riding programs.
    Page 123

  • Ambassador - Camping

    In addition to GSGATL’s five council camps, Girl Scouts may camp on other Girl Scout council campsites, or other youth agency camps; in state parks or national forests; or private campsites. Page 125

  • Dues and Money Earning

    Girl Scout troop, individual girl, and service unit projects should be funded through approved money-earning activities and dues. Page 109

  • Brownie - Uniform

    Girl Scout Daisies and Brownies may wear the khaki and white uniform, or they may wear official Girl Scout uniform components for their program level, such as the Daisy or Brownie beanie, shirt, skirt, leggings or other official components.
    Page 32

    Place your Journey awards above your badges.
    Page 64

  • Drivers

    Every driver must be an approved adult* volunteer and have a good driving record, a valid license, and a registered/insured vehicle. Page 87-97

  • Girl Scout Sunday

     Note that Girl Scout Week begins the Sunday on or before March 12 (a day known as “Girl Scout Sunday”) and extends through the Saturday following March 12 (a day known as “Girl Scout Sabbath”). Page 59

  • Court of Awards

    Court of Awards is a time to recognize girls who have earned badges and other awards, or accomplished something spectacular during the Girl Scout year. Page 60

  • Funds - Troop/Group

    Troop treasuries may consist of funds from troop money-earning projects, dues, and donations. 
    Page 37

    To ensure council compliance with IRS regulations and to protect the council’s 501(c) (3) tax exempt status with the IRS, GSGATL does not allow troops or other pathways to create reserve funds or earmark funds or financial disbursement for individual girls.
    Page 44 

    Girl Scout groups are funded by a share of money earned through council-sponsored product program activities (such as Girl Scout cookie activities), group money-earning activities (council-approved, of course), and any dues your group may charge. 
    Page 98

    Group dues are the monies girls contribute to help fund their group’s activities or meeting needs. 
    Page 99-111

  • Camping - Equipment

    When troops discover that they love camping and other outdoor adventures, it may become practical for them to own their own camping equipment.
    Page 128

    All remaining troop resources (camping equipment, books, or materials) should be either divided equally among the receiving troops (if girls are joining other troops) or given to the service unit director.
    Page 138

  • Emergencies - Emergency Procedures

    Prior to any event or activity, review the emergency procedures and evacuation routes specific to activity site. 
    Page 95

    Give injured person(s) first aid and simultaneously have someone call a hospital, ambulance service or doctor. 
    Page 97

  • Girl-led - Camping

    As a troop or other pathway leader, you not only supervise activities yourself, you help the other adults accompanying you understand what supervision means when activities are girl-led. Page 126

  • Camping - Tag-Alongs

    No child under the age of 5 years old may attend as a tag-along on a camping trip. Page 118

  • First Meeting

    When you first get together with girls (this meeting may also include parents/guardians, or you may decide to hold a separate meeting for the adults), you’ll want to get to know the girls, and give them a chance to get to know one another. 
    Page 16

    If you have a large support team, the first thing you’ll want to do is meet with this group and discuss what brought each of you to Girl Scouts, review your strengths and skills, and talk about how you would like to work together as a team. 
    Page 21

    The quiet sign can be extremely useful to you as a volunteer, so teach it to girls during your first meeting.
    Page 62

  • Graphic Guidelines

    Every item bearing the Girl Scout name and service mark, including items for resale or non-resale* by councils, shall conform to the Girl Scout Graphic Guidelines, published by GSUSA.
    Page 12

    Registered troop leaders may use Girl Scout graphic images provided by GSGATL in the annual Volunteer Marketing Toolkit for production print materials. 
    Page 42

  • Bank Account - Closing

    When a troop disbands, by rights the funds revert to GSGATL. Page 101

  • Brownie - Brownie Pin

    Pinning ceremonies help celebrate when girls receive grade-level Girl Scout pins. Page 60

  • Funds - Personal

    Troop/group and personal funds must not be comingled. Page 99

  • Girl Scout Law

    Girl Scout Promise On my honor, I will try: To serve God* and my country, To help people at all times, And to live by the Girl Scout Law.
    Page 7

    GSGATL is committed to an environment and climate in which relationships are characterized by dignity, respect, courtesy, and conduct that is in alignment with the principals of the Girl Scout Law. 
    Page 34

    Girl Scouting guides girls to become leaders in their daily lives, their communities, and the world—helping them become the kind of person exemplified by the Girl Scout Law. 
    Page 45

  • Alcohol

    Girl Scout volunteers and chaperones shall not possess, sell, or use illegal drugs.

  • Cadette - Travel

    Travel anywhere in the country, often lasting a week or more. Try to steer clear of trips girls might take with their families and consider those that offer some educational component. We encourage you to incorporate cities, historic sites, and museums around the country.
    Page 112

    Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors & Ambassadors Day travel is unlimited. 
    Page 116

    If a Girl Scout Cadette, Senior, or Ambassador will be traveling alone during any part of a trip, use the opportunity to help her feel comfortable with and capable of being on her own. 
    Page 119

  • Climbing Wall

    Thrill of high adventure: Misty Mountain, Meriwether, Pine Valley and Timber Ridge offer a variety of adventure challenges including climbing walls, ropes courses, and more. Page 123

  • Events - Council-Sponsored Events

    Councils may offer different experiences, based on availability of resources and partners in your area.
    Page 59

    Over 40 events are held at council camps each year offering opportunities for troop/weekend camping; day outings and family camping experiences. 
    Page 124

  • Adventure Course

    Misty Mountain, Meriwether, Pine Valley and Timber Ridge offer a variety of adventure challenges including climbing walls, ropes courses, and more.
    Page 123

    Use guidelines based on the program level of the youngest girl in the troop when considering troop activities.
    Page 92

    Also see Challenge Course: Some activities are designated as high risk activities. These activities have been classification as such because many of them require certified or specially trained instruction or oversight may require approval of the location and venue and/or have specific age/permission restrictions related to their use in Girl Scout programing.
    Page 114

  • Cookie Program - Internet Sales

    Announcements on how and when to sign up for those is sent out to troop cookie managers through eBudde.
    Page 105

    Girls are texting, calling, emailing, Tweeting, and Facebooking—and those are all effective ways that girls 13 and older can promote cookie and other product programs. 
    Page 106

  • Girl Scout Leadership Experience - and Financial Literacy

    Helping girls decide what they want to do, and coaching them as they earn and manage money to pursue their goals, is an integral part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE). Page 98

  • Disabilities - See Special Needs

    As you think about where, when, and how often to meet with your group, you will find yourself considering the needs, resources, safety, and beliefs of all members and potential members. As you do this, include the special needs of any members who have disabilities, or whose parents or guardians have disabilities. Page 83

  • Arts and Crafts

    All of the camps offer the traditional camp experiences girls know and love, including archery, canoeing, arts and crafts and outdoor skills. In addition, several camps offer the following specialty activities. Page 123

  • Fire - Fire Ring

    Fire Ring in the Unit. Page 125

  • Day Camp - Evaluations

     GSGATL conducts research and evaluation in many areas.  Page 14

  • Backpacking

    These activities have been classification as such because many of them require certified or specially trained instruction or oversight may require approval of the location and venue and/or have specific age/permission restrictions related to their use in Girl Scout programing.  Page 114

  • Brownie - Troop

    To organize a troop, you will need: Girl Scout Brownie, grades 2–3 and a mminimum number of 10 girls.
    Page 9

    Troops provide a flexible way for girls to meet. Some ideas include: » Fourteen Girl Scout Brownies who meet twice a month from November through March at a local community center.
    Page 132

    Typical kapers for a Daisy, Brownie, or Junior troop meeting might include: » Attendance Taker/Secretary Girl marks attendance sheet at each meeting (younger girls might use a poster). 
    Page 135

  • Girl Scout Leadership Experience and Travel

    To ensure that any travel you do with girls infuses the Girl Scout Leadership Experience at every opportunity, limit your role to facilitating the girls’ brainstorming and planning—but never doing the work for them. Page 113

  • Annual Fund - Contact

    Annual Fund Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9177  Page ii

  • Cookie Program - For Daisies

    Girl Scout Daisies (in kindergarten and first grade) may be involved in council-sponsored product program activities, but they cannot collect money in any other way except through group dues or parental contributions.
    Page 104

    Girl Scout Daisies are too young to be marketing online through their group, parent or guardian Web sites, or social media sites.
    Page 107

  • Group Sizes

    It is recommended that group sizes, when possible, are as follows: » Girl Scout Daisies: 5–12 girls » Girl Scout Brownies: 10–20 girls » Girl Scout Juniors: 10–25 girls » Girl Scout Cadettes: 5–25 girls » Girl Scout Seniors: 5–30 girls » Girl Scout Ambassadors: 5–30 girls. Page 18

  • Celebrations

    This section gives you an overview of annual celebrations in the Girl Scout year, as well as other revered Girl Scout traditions. Page 59

  • Events - Outdoor Program Events

    Over 40 events are held at council camps each year offering opportunities for troop/weekend camping; day outings and family camping experiences. Page 124

  • Executive Board

    In the executive board system (also called a steering committee), one leadership team makes decisions for the entire troop. Page 134

  • Archery

    Archery JR CD SR AM Venue must be pre-approved by GSGATL.
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities.
    Page 114

  • Brownie - Camping

    Currently registered Girl Scout Daisy (see special note below), Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior and Ambassador troops trained and accompanied by an adult who has taken council approved outdoor training, (as detailed below) and an adult with a current First Aid/CPR certification are eligible to apply for overnight camping.  Page 125

  • Business

    In addition to giving girls an opportunity to earn money to fund their Girl Scouting goals, taking part in the Girl Scout Cookie Program teaches girls five important skills that serve them throughout their lives: goal setting, money management, people skills, decision making, and business ethics.
    Page 51

    With every season of cookies, another generation of girls learns five important skills. 
    Page 103

    For examples, Cadettes can explore the food in other regions or countries for their New Cuisines badge, Seniors can find out about international business customs as part of their Business Etiquette badge, and Ambassadors can work on their Photography badge while documenting their trip.
    Page 113

    Troop business may include taking attendance, collecting dues, making announcements, and planning an upcoming event or trip. 
    Page 133

  • Girl Scout Promise

    Girl Scout Promise On my honor, I will try: To serve God* and my country, To help people at all times, And to live by the Girl Scout Law.
    Page 7

    Your other responsibilities as a Girl Scout volunteer include: » Accepting the Girl Scout Promise and Law.
    Page 20

    The Girl Scout Mission, Promise, and Law. 
    Page 80

  • Extended Trip Insurance

    Extended Trip Insurance: Information about the plans for extended trips of three nights or more is automatically sent to troop leaders who have successfully begun the trip approval process. Page 93

  • eBiz - Donating Through

    Give when you register for membership via eBiz!
    Page 13

    Members and troop leaders can “purchase” Annual Fund donations via the eBiz system.
    Page 81

  • Call Center

    After immediate emergency needs have been met, call the Mableton Service Center to report the emergency situation. 
    Page 33

    Office hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone: 770-702-9100 or 1-800-771-4046. At other times call this number: 1-888-644-0511 Your call will be handled by a call center and you will receive a return phone call from a GSGATL staff member within 30 minutes or less.
    Page 97

  • Girl Scout Week

     Note that Girl Scout Week begins the Sunday on or before March 12 (a day known as “Girl Scout Sunday”) and extends through the Saturday following March 12 (a day known as “Girl Scout Sabbath”). Page 59

  • Dues - Service Unit

    Service units may collect dues from girl members. Membership will not be denied based on an inability to pay service unit dues. 
    Page 38

    A girl will not be denied membership because her family is unable to pay service unit dues.
    Page 101

  • Brownie - Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls. Page 18

  • Girl Scout Promise - Ceremonies

    Ceremonies play an important part in our lives, from weddings to birthdays – and Girl Scouting is the same! Girl Scouts ceremonies are used not only to celebrate accomplishments, experience time-honored traditions, and reinforce the values of the Girl Scout Promise and Law, but also to encourage girls to take a short pause in their busy lives and connect with their fellow Girl Scouts in fun and meaningful ways.
    Page 60

    Girl or small group chooses and/or leads opening activity, which might be a flag ceremony, a song or poem, the Girl Scout Promise and Law, or something created by the girls; it could also be the opening activity from the Journey Sample Session. 
    Page 135

    Investiture is a traditional ceremony that welcomes girls and adults into Girl Scouting; each new member makes her Girl Scout Promise and is invested with the symbols of membership, the appropriate Girl Scout pin and the World Trefoil pin. Typically troops have their (girl-planned) Investiture Ceremony between the fourth and sixth meeting, but there’s no rule. 
    Page 139

  • Conflict Resolution

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta encourages volunteers and staff to take positive actions to resolve conflicts quickly. Page 29

  • Fees - Start-Up

    New troops or groups may ask parents to donate a one-time startup fee when the troop begins meeting (up to a maximum of $25).
    Page 99

    If this is a recently-organized troop, where other families have been asked to contribute a start-up fee, the new member’s family should be asked as well. 
    Page 100

  • First Aid - In Emergencies

    All accidents/incidents requiring treatment beyond basic first aid must be reported to GSGATL’s Risk Management at 770-702-9167.
    Page 32

    Administer first aid as needed and per your training. 
    Page 89

    Give injured person(s) first aid and simultaneously have someone call a hospital, ambulance service or doctor. 
    Page 97

  • Funds - Misappropriation

     Misappropriation of funds could result in legal action. Page 37

  • Girl-led

    At Girl Scouts, everything centers around the girl: activities are girl-led, which gives girls the opportunity to learn by doing in a cooperative learning environment.
    Page 7

    Because Girl Scouting is girl-led, it’s important to give girls the chance to pick the Journey they want to do. 
    Page 15

    All activities are girl-led.
    Page 17

    Working in a partnership with girls so that their activities are girl-led, allow them to learn by doing, and allow for cooperative (group) learning; you’ll also partner with other volunteers and GSGATL staff for support and guidance.
    Page 20

  • Funds - Distribution

    Helping girls decide what they want to do, and coaching them as they earn and manage money to pursue their goals, is an integral part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE). 
    Page 98

    The girls must be part of the decision on how to use or distribute the troop’s funds.
    Page 137

    They may either be used as planned before the new troop is formed, or be evenly distributed between the old and new troops, using a pro rata per girl share.
    Page138

  • Golden Eagle

    The first of these awards, in 1916, was the Golden Eagle of Merit. In 1919, the name changed to The Golden Eaglet, and in 1920, the requirements for The Golden Eaglet were updated. Page 58

  • Facilities - Camp

    Day camping is usually council sponsored or approved, with the council training the staff and approving the facilities and site.
    Page 124 

    Safety means helping girls be safe and secure and preventing accidents as they take part in activities or use facilities, supplies, equipment and tools.
    Page 127

    Be sure to read the descriptions in Campsite 411 closely so you are sure that you are getting the type of facility you and the girls want or need.
    Page 128

  • Financial Literacy

    In addition to the Leadership Journeys, girls at each Girl Scout grade level have their own edition of The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting—a binder full of information about being a Girl Scout and how to earn certain badges, including ones about financial literacy and the Girl Scout Cookie Program.
    Page 50 

    The following examples of money-earning projects from councils and USA Girl Scouts Overseas committees, give girls a way to build public speaking, financial literacy, marketing, and other skills. 
    Page 108

  • Discrepancies

    If there is a discrepancy with the troop/group funds: » The troop leader, assistant leader and adult treasurer will meet to determine the problem and resolve it. Page 100

  • Girl Scout Leadership Experience - Awards

    Like everything girls do in Girl Scouting, the steps to earning these awards are rooted in the GSLE. Page 58

  • Daisy - Circle/Treehouse

    Daisy/Brownie Circle/Treehouse: While sitting in a circle (sometimes called a ring), girls create a formal group decision-making body. Page 134

  • Calendar

    One way to start planning your time with girls, visit www.girlscouts.org/MyCalendar. 
    Page 15

    When you first get together with girls (this meeting may also include parents/guardians, or you may decide to hold a separate meeting for the adults), you’ll want to get to know the girls, and give them a chance to get to know one another. 
    Page 16

    Girl Scouts celebrate several special days each year, which you’re encouraged to include in your group planning. 
    Page 59

  • Ambassador - Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls. These supervision ratios were devised to ensure the safety and health of girls. Page 18

  • Camping - Adult Supervision

    Girl Scouts’ adult-to-girl ratios show the minimum number of adults needed to supervise a specific number of girls. 
    Page 18

    Arrange for proper adult supervision of girls. 
    Page 19

    For events, travel, and camping trips, two unrelated female adults who do not live in the same household must be present at all times.
    Page 26

     Your group must have at least two unrelated, approved adult volunteers present at all times, plus additional adult volunteers as necessary, depending on the size of the group and the ages and abilities of girls. 
    Page 85

    ALL adults participating in a camping trip, including day trips, must be at least 18 years old, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement, and must be approved volunteers with a criminal background check on record that dates back no further than three years....



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  • Camping - Training

    Trained Troop camper present during the trip. Page 115

  • Early Registration

    Girls are encouraged to register early to avoid the fall rush; the actual registration goes into effect on October 1. Page 80

  • Global Girl Scouting

    Global Girl Scouting ensures that girls have increased awareness about the world, cross-cultural learning opportunities, and education on relevant global issues that may inspire them to take action to make the world a better place. Page 10

  • Daisy - Camping

    Currently registered Girl Scout Daisy (see special note below), Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior and Ambassador troops trained and accompanied by an adult who has taken council approved outdoor training, (as detailed below) and an adult with a current First Aid/CPR certification are eligible to apply for overnight camping. Page 125

  • Day Trips

    When girls are ready — take progressively longer trips working up to full day trips. Page 116

  • Appointment

    Girl Scout volunteers must be appointed to their position, using the procedures below. It is the responsibility of the prospective volunteer to complete all the required steps. Page 26

  • Sledding

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities » Sledding & Snow Tubing. Page 114

  • Text Messages

    Girls are texting, calling, emailing, Tweeting, and Facebooking—and those are all effective ways that girls 13 and older can promote cookie and other product programs. Page 106

  • Sewing

    Refer to “At-A-Glance Guidelines for Program Activities for Girl Scouts” on page 92 to see which activities are appropriate for girls at each program level. Sewing. Page 123

  • Social Media

    Girl Scout troops/groups and service units may create a Web site or use social media to promote, or communicate with members regarding, Girl Scout activities. 
    Page 41

    When appropriate, have a parent’s or guardian’s written permission before using pictures of girls on any print or electronic materials—including social media. 
    Page 42

    Troops whose girls meet age criteria (13 years or older) and have parental permission may set up a troop Web site or social networking site. 
    Page 87

    The following sections detail how girls can use electronic marketing, social media, and group Web sites to gather sale commitments from family, friends, and previous customers.
    Page 106

  • Take Action Projects

    With Journeys, girls experience the keys to leadership and learn to identify community needs, work in partnership with their communities, and carry out Take Action projects that make a lasting difference.
    Page 58

    Take Action Projects are at the heart of the Leadership Journeys and the Girl Scout Bronze, Silver and Gold Awards.
    Page 140

  • Silver Award

    The Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are Girl Scouting’s highest awards.
    Page 58

    Girl Scout Bronze (or Silver or Gold) Award ceremonies honor Girl Scout Juniors who have earned the Girl Scout Bronze Award (Cadettes who have earned the Silver Award; Seniors or Ambassadors who have earned the Gold Award).
    Page 60

  • Substance Abuse

    Alcohol and Substance Abuse. Page 33

  • Sewing

    Refer to “At-A-Glance Guidelines for Program Activities for Girl Scouts” on page 92 to see which activities are appropriate for girls at each program level. Sewing. Page 123

  • Service Unit Director - Troop Finance Responsibilities

    Troops must submit finance reports to troop parents at least twice yearly, to the service unit annually, and to the Council as requested.
    Page 38

    Money-earning refers to activities troops and service units engage in to earn revenue that directly supports the troop or service unit.
    Page 39

    Troop leaders are required to submit the following to their service unit director by June 15 annually: » A troop finance report form. » A copy of the troop’s most recent bank statement. » A detailed plan of how existing funds will be used.
    Page 99

    The final troop finance report must indicate how the funds were distributed. 
    Page 101

  • Situation Report

    If a solution is not resolved privately between the two parties involved, the next step is for one or both or all individuals to file a written Situation Report (form available on the GSGATL Web site or from Membership and Volunteer Experience staff members) with her/his next level of support. 
    Page 29

    Council Situation Report Use this form to document a conflict (refer to Policy 11. Conflict Resolution on page 29). » www.gsgatl.org/volunteer-essentials/situation-report.
    Page 141

  • Special Days

    Girl Scouts celebrate several special days each year, which you’re encouraged to include in your group planning. Page 59 

  • Start-Up Fee

    New troops or groups may ask, but not require, parents to donate to a one-time startup fee when the troop begins meeting. Page 38

  • Surfing

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. » Surfing. Page 114

  • Songs

    Signs, Songs, Handshake, and More! 
    Page 61

    Whether singing around a campfire or joining a chorus of voices on the Mall in Washington, D.C., Girl Scouts have always enjoyed the fun and fellowship of music. 
    Page 62

  • Skiing

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher.  Page 92

  • Sexual Abuse

    Any sexual act between an adult and child. 
    Page 35

    Sexual abuse occurs when a parent or other adult uses a child under age 18 for sexual stimulation.
    Page 78

  • Sponsors

    Sponsors help Girl Scout councils ensure that all girls in the community have an opportunity to participate in Girl Scouting. Page 108

  • Slogan

    The Girl Scout slogan is, “Do a good turn daily.” Page 62

  • Tag Along

    A tag-along is any unregistered adult or sibling of girls in the troop who is accompanying the troop on a trip or activity. 
    Page 93

    A tag-along is any unregistered adult or child who is accompanying the troop on a trip or activity. 
    Page 117

  • Severe Storm

    Severe Storm » Be calm and reassure the participants. Page 96

  • Special Needs

     As you do this, include the special needs of any members who have disabilities, or whose parents or guardians have disabilities. Page 83

  • Smoking

    Smoking and the use of other tobacco products at all GSGATL facilities and properties is prohibited. Page 33

  • Smoking

    Smoking and the use of other tobacco products at all GSGATL facilities and properties is prohibited. Page 33

  • Take Action Projects - Funding

    The project should focus on addressing the root cause of the issue, not merely supporting another organization with material donations or funds.
    Page 40

    Girls, however, may be eligible for incentives and credits that they put toward Girl Scout activities, such as camp, travel, Take Action projects, and Girl Scout membership dues for the next year. 
    Page 104

    Product programs are a great way to earn the funds necessary for girls to travel or carry out Take Action projects.
    Page 107

  • Special Needs - Camping

    Include girls with disabilities and other special needs! Page 126

  • Sponsors

    Sponsors help Girl Scout councils ensure that all girls in the community have an opportunity to participate in Girl Scouting. Page 108

  • Snorkeling

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities » Snorkeling. Page 114

  • South Region

    South Region: Butts, Coweta, Fayette, Henry, Heard, Meriwether, Lamar, Newton, Pike, Rockdale, Spalding, Troup and Upson. Page 10

  • Shooting .See also Riflery

    *Rifle/Gun safety - Restricted - Age 12 & above – must have prior written approval from GSGATL and parents. Page 92

  • Service Unit Director

    SUD is an acronym for Service Unit Director, an administrative volunteer who manages Girl Scouting in a specific geographic area, called a service unit (see above.) She (or occasionally he!) works with her membership specialist to set membership and fund-raising goals, and creates a plan to meet that goal. Page 140

  • Timber Ridge

    Resident camping is available at five of our council’s camps: Pine Valley, Pine Acres, Timber Ridge, Meriwether and Misty Mountain.
    Page 123

    Day camping is available concurrent with resident camp at both Timber Ridge and Pine Acres.
    Page 124

    Timber Ridge. 
    Page 125

  • SUD. See Service Unit Director

    SUD is an acronym for Service Unit Director, an administrative volunteer who manages Girl Scouting in a specific geographic area, called a service unit (see above.)
    Page  140

  • Swimming

    Swimming in Pools - DA BR JR CD SR AM - Swim test required before 1st swim.
    Page 92 

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. » Swimming.
    Page 114

    The following chart shows some of the activities that are offered at each camp - Swimming Pool.
    Page 123

  • Snowboarding

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher. Page 92

  • Resident Camp

    Resident Camp offers girls entering kindergarten (plus Mom) and older the opportunity to camp for two to fourteen days and nights (the average is six nights). Page 123

  • Mismanagement of Funds

    If there is a discrepancy with the troop/group funds: » The troop leader, assistant leader and adult treasurer will meet to determine the problem and resolve it. Page 100

  • Trip - Planning Matrix

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Trip Planning Matrix. Page 115 

  • Keeping Girls Engaged

    Keeping Girls Engaged With Girl Scouts. Page 137

  • Minimum Impact

    The rules and suggestions below are, for the most part, versions of commonly agreed upon practices employed to achieve minimum impact outdoor activities. Page 129

  • Senior - Journeys

    This Journey is their chance to imagine a perfect world— for girls. Page 49

  • Resident Camp - Contact

    Summer Resident Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9140.  Page ii

  • Service Unit - Cookie Manager

     Be sure to check with your service unit cookie manager on the practice in your area. Page 105

  • Inflatables

    Inflatables such as ball bounces, slides or moonwalks - All levels - Appropriate adult supervision must be provided at all time when inflated.
    Page 92

  • Senior - Finances

    At the Cadette level and above, an adult mentors the girls as they keep the troop’s financial records and give reports to parents and troop volunteers. 
    Page 100

    Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors Girls estimate costs based on plans.
    Page 111

  • Promise - See also My Promise, My Faith, See also Girl Scout Promise

    The Girl Scout Law includes many of the principles and values common to most faiths. And even though Girl Scouts is a secular organization, we’ve always encouraged girls to explore spirituality via their own faiths.  Page 51

  • Meeting Locations

    Where to meet can be a bit trickier: a meeting place needs to provide a safe, clean, and secure environment that allows for the participation of all girls. Page 70

  • Kaper Chart

    They might even enjoy the tradition of a kaper chart (a chore chart that lists all the chores and assigns girls’ names to each), so that everyone takes turns at each responsibility.
    Page 134

    A kaper chart divides and rotates the jobs fairly among the girls.
    Page 135 

  • Senior - Troop

    To organize a troop, you will need: Girl Scout Senior, grades 9–10 - 5
    Page 9

    The following are some traditions troops have used for girl-led governance, but these are just examples. Junior/Cadette/Senior/Ambassador Patrol or Team System: In this system, large troops divide into small groups, with every member playing a role. Teams of four to six girls are recommended so that each girl gets a chance to participate and express her opinions. 
    Page 134

  • Treasury. See also Money-Earning;Finance Report

    The troop treasury may be used to support adult membership if needed.
    Page 23

    Troop treasuries may consist of funds from troop money-earning projects, dues, and donations. 
    Page 37

    Parents may be asked to contribute to a troop or group treasury in the following ways: » New troops or groups may ask parents to donate a one-time startup fee when the troop begins meeting (up to a maximum of $25). 
    Page 99

    The troop may not give girls cash from the treasury account. 
    Page 137

  • Travel. See also Trips

    Not only do some of the most memorable moments in a Girl Scout’s life happen while taking trips, but travel also offers a wealth of opportunities for girls to develop leadership skills. Page 112

  • Savannah

    All trips involving high risk activities, trips to the Birthplace in Savannah, extended trips (three nights or more), cruises, and international travel require written council permission in advance of the trip.
    Page 114

    Trips to visit the Birthplace in Savannah, GA of any duration. 
    Page 115

    The Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace in Savannah, Georgia, is a fantastic place for Girl Scout Juniors and older to visit. Reservations and council approval are required to take a group of girls to visit the birthplace, and most educational opportunities are booked at least a year in advance, so book early! Families and individuals, however, do not need to reserve a tour in advance.
    Page 116

  • Teenage Girls

    Consider the following tips when working with teenage girls: » Think of yourself as a partner, and as a coach or mentor, as needed (not a “leader”). Page 76

  • Service Unit Director - Other Responsibilities

    The service unit director responsible for overseeing the volunteer is responsible for notifying their membership specialist at GSGATL if they become aware of a situation involving one of the above bulleted items. 
    Page 28

    The correct protocol for seeking assistance with conflict management is in the following order: a) Affected parties and the troop leader, if the troop leader is not a party to the conflict; b) Service unit director, if the service unit director is not a party to the conflict;
    Page 29

    The service unit director or designee is charged with certifying the application and submitting it to the membership specialist at least two (2) weeks prior to the event. 
    Page 107

    Your service unit director or designee can verify who has been approved. 
    Page 114

     Let your service unit director know as soon as possible that you won’t be continuing, and offer to help find or recommend a replacement...



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  • SUD Support Team. See also Service Unit

    General Questions/ Service Unit Information . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9110.
    Page iii 

    As a volunteer, you will have the most contact with your Girl Scout support team, called a service unit.
    Page 13

    Maintaining a close connection to your volunteer support team.
    Page 21 

  • Skateboarding

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher.  Page 92

  • Sex Offender

    GSGATL reserves the right to conduct a multi-state search, Georgia statewide search, county search, sex offender registry search, as well as an OFAC (Office of Foreign Assets Control)* search and any other necessary search.
    Page 24

    A Registered Sex Offender (those persons subject to registration under O.C.G.A. §42-1-12, et seq,) may not serve as a troop leader, assistant leader, troop helper, chaperone or in any other troop volunteer position. 
    Page 36

  • Three Processes

    In keeping with the three processes of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience, be sure that: » All activities are girl-led. Take into account the age and abilities of the girls. 
    Page 17

    Fun with Purpose – 3 Processes.
    Page 46

  • Special Needs - Contact

    Girls with Special Needs/ Disability Awareness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9411. Page ii

  • Membership - Dues

    Each member also agrees to follow safety guidelines and pay the annual membership dues of $15. Page 8

  • Overnight Troop Camping

    The first overnight experience should include a parent or other guardian for each girl.
    Page 116

    An overnight troop camping experience once the troop has completed a full year together and has successfully completed a variety of day trips.
    Page 125

  • Safety - Girl Responsibilities

    Girls who learn about and practice safe and healthy behaviors are likely to establish lifelong habits of safety consciousness. Page 86 

  • Money-Earning

    Troop treasuries may consist of funds from troop money-earning projects, dues, and donations.
    Page 37

    Money-earning refers to activities troops and service units engage in to earn revenue that directly supports the troop or service unit. 
    Page 39

    Girls earn money in two distinct ways.
    Page 102-103

     

  • Safety - Safety Seats

    We are frequently asked if troop leaders and parent drivers are required to have booster seats in cars when transporting Girl Scouts. Page 88

  • Hiking

    Hiking Trails. Page 125

  • Membership Specialist

    Membership Registration Questions . . 770-702- or ebiz@gsgatl.org
    Page iii

    If a solution is not resolved privately between the two parties involved, the next step is for one or both or all individuals to file a written Situation Report (form available on the GSGATL Web site or from Membership and Volunteer Experience staff members) with her/his next level of support. 
    Page 29

    If you have any question on private benefit or troop account activities please reach out to your regional membership manager.
    Page 99

    If you find that a troop isn’t available for these girls, work with your membership specialist to find other options—camp, series, event, and travel pathways for example!
    Page 137

    Application forms are available online or from your membership specialist.  Page 139...



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  • Licensed Vendors

  • Money-Earning - Procedures

    Product programs are a great way to earn the funds necessary for girls to travel or carry out Take Action projects.  Page 107

  • Online Shopping

    GSGATL is excited to offer online shopping through our Web site. Page 11

  • Missing Person

    After determining that a person is missing, one adult needs to remain in area where the person was last seen. Page 95

  • Troop Camper

    If your camping trip requires a Troop camper, refer to the Training pages on our Web site for additional training details.
    Page 125

    Trained Troop Camper – Completes council sponsored troop camping training, then trains girls and other adults and accompanies them to camp. 
    Page 133

  • GSRI - See Girl Scout Research Institute - Gun Safety - See also Riflery

    Rifle/Gun safety -  Restricted Age 12 & above – must have prior written approval from GSGATL and parents. Page 92

  • Juliettes

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta uses the title “Juliette” for a girl who registers in Girl Scouts individually, rather than as part of a specific pathway. 
    Page 9

    “Juliettes” – in the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta council, girls who choose to register as an individual member of Girl Scouts of the USA (as opposed to registering with a troop, series, camp, or other pathway) are called Juliettes, in honor of our Founder, Juliette Low. 
    Page 139

     

  • Junior

    Girl Scout Junior (grades 4–5). 
    Page 8

    At the Girl Scout Junior level (fourth and fifth grades), girls . . . This means . . . They want to make decisions and express their opinions.
    Page 72

  • Inclusiveness

    Inclusiveness Policy Statement. Page 23

  • Rain

    Council camps are not closed and refunds are not made because of rain. Include rainy day activities in your planning with girls! Page 124

  • Little Brownie Bakers

    Two commercial bakers are currently licensed by Girl Scouts of the USA to produce Girl Scout Cookies—Little Brownie Bakers and ABC/Interbake Foods—and each council selects the baker of its choice. Page 103

  • Service Unit - Contact

    Service Unit Information . . . . . . . . . . . . 770-702-9110. Page ii

  • Trademark

    Protecting the Girl Scout trademark is important to all of us and ultimately benefits everyone in Girl Scouting. Page 12

  • Training - Financial Assistance

    Scholarship and travel assistance may be available to help adults defray the cost of attending Girl Scout training courses or special events held outside GSGATL’s jurisdiction, including the National Council Meeting (Girl Scouts of the USA Conference.). Page 30

  • Insurance - For Trips

    Extended Trip Insurance: Information about the plans for extended trips of three nights or more is automatically sent to troop leaders who have successfully begun the trip approval process.
    Page 93

    Completed Insurance Application and premium payment (required for trips of three nights or more).
    Page 115

  • My Promise, My Faith

    The Girl Scout Law includes many of the principles and values common to most faiths. Page 51

  • Paddleboats

    *Paddleboats - BR JR CD SR AM - Must be comfortable swimming in deep water. Page 92

  • Sailing

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities » Sailing.
    Page 114

    Check out Pine Acres where girls can hone their skills while sailing, paddleboarding, or kayaking on beautiful Lake Allatoona. 
    Page 123

  • Service Unit - Finance Reports

    Troops must submit finance reports to troop parents at least twice yearly, to the service unit annually, and to the Council as requested. Page 38

  • Recognition Committee

    GSGATL’s Council Recognition Committee (CRC) reviews and submits nominations for board confirmation from the Board of Directors for awards that include criteria specified by GSUSA. Page 22

  • Troop Camping. See also Camping Reservations

    Overnight troop (group) camping, often referred to as “weekend camping” in our council, is available for girls in kindergarten and older, and typically lasts over three consecutive days and two nights. Page 124

  • Internal Revenue Service

    IRS regulations require that contributions of $250 or more have documentation from the legal nonprofit entity receiving the gift.
    Page 41

    Per the IRS, “a section 501(c)(3) organization must not be organized or operated for the benefit of private interests. No part of the net earnings of a section 501(c)(3) organization may inure to the benefit of any private shareholder or individual.” 
    Page 44

    The IRS requires that 501(c)(3) organizations must not be organized or operated for the benefit of private interests.
    Page 99

    There are a few specific guidelines—some required by the Internal Revenue Service—that ensure that sales are conducted with legal and financial integrity. 
    Page 102

    Due to the strict IRS and reporting standards, volunteers may not apply for grant funding of any kind. Generally, a grant requires a formal application to be submitted....



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  • Investiture

    Investiture - This ceremony welcomes new members, girls or adults, into the Girl Scout family for the first time. Girls receive their Girl Scout, Brownie Girl Scout, or Daisy Girl Scout pin and their World Trefoil pin at this time.
    Page 60

    Investiture is a traditional ceremony that welcomes girls and adults into Girl Scouting; each new member makes her Girl Scout Promise and is invested with the symbols of membership, the appropriate Girl Scout pin and the World Trefoil pin. 
    Page 139

  • Recognition - Girl Recognition

    From the beginning of Girl Scouts, one prestigious award has recognized the girls who make a difference in their communities and in their own lives. 
    Page 58

    Girls give the sign when they: Receive an award, patch, pin, or other recognition.
    Page 61

    We also establish guidelines and procedures for conducting the sale and determines how the proceeds and recognition system will be managed. 
    Page 103

    Girls may earn official Girl Scout grade-appropriate rewards and recognitions related to product program activities. 
    Page 104

  • Trips - Driving Procedures

    Vehicles should be kept a safe distance apart if traveling together. It is not recommended that vehicles travel by convoy. Page 89

  • Troop - Training

    Refer to “Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Trip Planning Matrix” on page 115 for more information about the appropriate training and approval procedures for camping trips. Page 125

  • Membership

    All adult volunteers, except those adults serving as temporary advisors or consultants, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement and must pay the applicable membership dues on an annual basis and meet GSUSA membership requirements. 
    Page 23

    Every participant (girl or adult) in Girl Scouting must register and become a member of Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA). GSUSA membership dues are valid for one year, from October 1 through September 30. Membership dues (currently $15) are sent by GSGATL to GSUSA; no portion of the dues stays with the council. Membership dues may not be transferred to another member and are not refundable. 
    Page 80

    Membership MAY NOT BE DENIED based on the inability to pay the start-up fee. 
    Page 99

    Membership registration, registered member: one of the steps required to become a Girl Scout is to fill out a Membership Registration form (online or on paper) and pay GSUSA’s annual membership dues for the year. ...



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  • Second Century Circle

    Or join the new Second Century Circle to help Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta launch the next 100 years of Girl Scouting by making girls a philanthropic priority. Page 13

  • Senior - Awards

    Once a girl checks the Awards Log in The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting to make sure there’s not already a badge on the topic she wants to explore, she’ll follow steps outlined in her handbook to complete the requirements for her very own badge. 
    Page 51

    The Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards are Girl Scouting’s highest awards.
    Page 58

  • Make Your Own Badge

    Once a year, individual Girl Scout Brownies through Ambassadors are welcome to develop and complete activities to make their own badge—a great way to learn a new skill while exploring a topic of personal interest. Page 51

  • Juliette Gordon Low

    Girl Scouts of the USA was founded in 1912 by trailblazer Juliette Gordon Low. 
    Page 5

    October 31: Founder’s Day (Juliette Gordon Low’s birthday).
    Page 59 

    To honor Juliette Gordon Low’s love of travel, of experiencing different cultures, and of making friends, Girl Scouts created the Juliette Low World Friendship Fund in 1927.
    Page 112

    The Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace in Savannah, Georgia, is a fantastic place for Girl Scout Juniors and older to visit.
    Page 116

  • Service Unit - Recognitions

    GSGATL encourages service unit directors and service unit teams to recognize volunteer accomplishments at each service unit meeting and within the community. Page 22

  • Restriction of Fiduciary Responsibilities

    If a volunteer has been charged with or convicted of, or has pled guilty to, received a deferred adjudication for, or pled no contest to misdemeanor crimes involving theft, fraud, or forgery, or other crimes of dishonesty in the event that the person is allowed to continue as a volunteer, that person will be restricted from management of Girl Scout money. Page 28

  • Training - Policies

    Continuing operational volunteers agree to complete and/or update training as required for the position.
    Page 27

    All appointed volunteers must participate in an orientation to Girl Scouting and any required training as stated on the volunteer position description. 
    Page 31

  • Outdoor Cooking

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities. » Outdoor Cooking. Page 114

  • Service Unit - Annual Fund Goal

    Fundraising refers to activities that raise funds for Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta. Fundraising activities should be planned and driven by adults, and may be used to meet a service unit Annual Fund goal. 
    Page 40

    The key to meeting your troop and service unit’s Annual Fund goal is to ask every parent for a $50 gift during registration. 
    Page 82

    Each family is asked to donate $50 per girl toward the GSGATL Annual Fund.
    Page 99

  • Procedures for Accidents

    Prior to any event or activity, review the emergency procedures and evacuation routes specific to activity site. Page 95

  • Snow Tubing

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities » Sledding & Snow Tubing. Page 114

  • Medication

    Avoid driving for extended periods at night, when tired, or taking medication that makes you drowsy.
    Page 89

    Medication, including over-the-counter products, must never be dispensed without prior written permission from a girl’s custodial parent or guardian. 
    Page 91

  • Trips. See also Travel Age Guidelines

  • Males

    Girl Scout volunteers are also a diverse group—you may be a college volunteer working on a community-action project, a parent volunteer ready for an outdoor adventure with your daughter’s group, or any responsible adult (female or male, who has passed the necessary screening process) looking to help prime girls for the day when they’ll lead—however and wherever they choose. Page 8

  • Handgliding

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher. Page 92

  • Hunting

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher. 
    Page 92

  • Journeys - And Travel

    Using Journeys and The Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting in Their Travels. Page 113

  • Money-Earning Application

    Troops must submit a Money Earning Application along with the latest copy of the troop’s bank statement to the appropriate service unit team member. Page 107

  • Travel - With Camp

    Whether they go for a day, week, or longer, Girl Scout camping gives girls an opportunity to grow, explore, and have fun under the guidance of caring, trained adults. Page 123

  • Outdoor Skills

    Camping is a great way for girls to explore leadership, build skills and confidence, and develop a deep appreciation for nature. Page 123

  • Trampolining

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher.  Page 92

  • Keys To Leadership

    We have identified Three Keys to Leadership: girls discover themselves and their values; connect with others; and take action to make the world a better place.
    Page 7

    Understanding the Three Keys to Leadership that are the basis of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience: Discover, Connect, and Take Action.
    Page 20

    In other words: Discover + Connect + Take Action = Leadership. And everything you do with girls in Girl Scouting is aimed at giving them the benefits of these Three Keys to Leadership. 
    Page 45

    Use the adult guide to incorporate activities and discussions that help girls explore the Three Keys to Leadership (Discover, Connect, and Take Action) as they plan their trip and eventually travel.
    Page 113

  • Resignation

    In order to maintain professionalism in our volunteer organization, a person having reason(s) to resign is provided with appropriate channels to follow. Page 28

  • "I" Statements

    Perhaps the most important tip for communicating with parents/guardians is for you to use “I” statements instead of “you” statements. “I” statements, which are detailed in the aMAZE Journey for Girl Scout Cadettes, tell someone what you need from her or him, while “you” statements may make the person feel defensive. Page 78

  • Rifery

    Rifle/Gun safety Restricted Age 12 & above – must have prior written approval from GSGATL and parents.
    Page 92

    Some activities are designated as high risk activities » Riflery
    Page 114

    Riflery
    Page 123

  • Treats and Keeps - Internet Sales

    Specific permission must be obtained when a girl intends to use the Internet for product marketing. Page 104

  • National Getaways

     Troop travel also includes national Getaways and international Jamborees, which range from two days to three weeks and are for Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors. Page 113

  • Reappointment

    Troop and other Pathway* volunteers, other volunteers who work directly with girls, service unit volunteers, training facilitators, camp and other council volunteers, must demonstrate inclusiveness, and knowledge of and commitment to safety issues, in addition to financial responsibility, in order to continue in a volunteer role. Page 26

  • Recruitment

    A position description will be provided for each volunteer position outlining the purpose, accountability, principal duties, and term of service of the position. Page 23

  • Motto

    The Girl Scout motto is, “Be prepared.” We share the Be Prepared motto and the good turn with all Girl Scouts and Guides. Page 62

  • Tobacco

    Smoke-Free/Tobacco-Free Environment. Page 33

  • Membership - Registration

    Ensuring all participants become registered members of Girl Scouts of the USA by paying annual membership dues using eBiz, a web-based online registration system hosted by GSUSA.
    Page 21

    All adult volunteers, except those adults serving as temporary advisors or consultants, must be registered members of the Girl Scout Movement and must pay the applicable membership dues on an annual basis and meet GSUSA membership requirements. 
    Page 23

    eBiz is a web-based system hosted by GSUSA that allows for members to purchase their GSUSA membership online, register for events and enroll in GSGATL-sponsored learning opportunities. 
    Page 81

  • Pathways

    In an effort to make the Troop Pathway to Girl Scouts fun for girls, easier for leaders, and still meet the goals set by Girl Scouts of the USA, Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta has established a minimum troop size for new troops by program level. 
    Page 9

     Although some girls who are in a group (for example, a troop of Cadettes) may decide to travel together, the Travel Pathway exists for girls who are not otherwise involved in Girl Scouts to get together Chapter 7: Trips, Travel and Events 112 Volunteer Essentials — Chapter 7: Trips, Travel and Events specifically for the purpose of traveling locally, regionally, and even internationally.
    Page 112-113

    Let girls who feel their life is too busy for troop meetings know that’s okay—Girl Scouts offers many ways (pathways) to participate. 
    Page 137

  • Junior - Camping

    Currently registered Girl Scout Daisy (see special note below), Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior and Ambassador troops trained and accompanied by an adult who has taken council approved outdoor training, (as detailed below) and an adult with a current First Aid/CPR certification are eligible to apply for overnight camping. Page 125

  • Service Unit - Funds

    When a service unit splits or disbands, the funds in the service unit treasury will be prorated between the new service units or go to the absorbing service unit.
    Page 38

    However, creating or maintaining reserve funds or tracking money earned by girl within troop or service unit treasuries is not compatible with this guidance and is therefore not allowed. 
    Page 44

    Service Unit Funds.
    Page 101

    Only approved volunteers may work directly with girls or handle troop or service unit funds. 
    Page 139

    She (or occasionally he!) works with her membership specialist to set membership and fund-raising goals, and creates a plan to meet that goal.
    Page 140

  • Service Centers

    Our administrative headquarters, volunteer service center and largest Badge & Sash Girl Scout Store are located at 5601 North Allen Road in Mableton, Georgia; regional service centers and Badge & Sash stores are located in Dalton and Griffin, and a Badge & Sash Store is located in Cumming and in Tucker.  Page 10

  • Senior - Uniform

    The official Girl Scout uniform for girls is a white shirt (either their own or the official Girl Scout polo shirt for their program level), their own khaki pants or skirt, and the official program level tunic, vest, or sash.
    Page 32

    Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors have an official neckerchief-style scarf to wear with their uniform, especially when they are at World Centres, Jamborees, or other events with Guides from other countries, who typically wear a neckerchief, scarf, or tie. 
    Page 62

    Girl Scout Senior Sash & Vest.
    Page 67

  • Ropes Course. See also Challenge Course

    Misty Mountain, Meriwether, Pine Valley and Timber Ridge offer a variety of adventure challenges including climbing walls, ropes courses, and more. Page 123

  • Recruitment

    A position description will be provided for each volunteer position outlining the purpose, accountability, principal duties, and term of service of the position. Page 23

  • Senior - Activities

    At-A-Glance Guidelines for Program Activities for Girl Scouts. Page 92

  • Troop Meeting - Opening

    The opening focuses attention and allows girls to start the meeting. Each troop decides how to open their own meeting—most begin with the Girl Scout Promise and Law, and then add a simple flag ceremony, song, game, story, or other ceremony designed by the girls.  Page 133

  • Selection

    Appointment to a volunteer position with GSGATL is contingent upon completion and review of a volunteer application, criminal background check, and possibly reference checks. Page 24

  • Goal Setting

    These awards offer girls relevant, grade-level-appropriate challenges related to teamwork, goal setting, and community networking and leadership. 
    Page 58

    Girls who set goals are more likely to reach or exceed those goals – from selling cookies or magazines to completing their science project on time! 
    Page 103

    Set goals for money-earning activities. What do girls hope to accomplish through this activity?
    Page 110

  • Robotics

     In the past, these have covered topics like the environment, robotics, and space exploration. Page 59

  • Junior - Troop

    Girl Scout Junior, grades 4–5, Minimum number of 10 girls.
    Page 9

    And feel free to use the sample welcome letter and friends/family checklist in the Girl Scout Daisy, Brownie, and Junior Leadership Journeys to assist you in expanding your troop’s adult network. 
    Page 132

    Junior/Cadette/Senior/Ambassador Patrol or Team System: In this system, large troops divide into small groups, with every member playing a role. 
    Page 134

    Junior/Cadette/Senior/Ambassador Town Meeting: Under the town meeting system, business is discussed and decisions are made at meetings attended by all the girls in the troop.
    Page 135

  • Quiet Sign

    The quiet sign can be extremely useful to you as a volunteer, so teach it to girls during your first meeting. Page 62

  • Photo Keepsakes

    But first, please keep in mind that girls: Can have customers pay online (using GSUSA-approved software programs for magazines, photo keepsakes, chocolate or nut items, and cookies). Page 106

  • National Leadership Journeys. See Journeys

    The Girl Scout program is based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), in which girls Discover themselves, Connect with others, and Take Action to make the world a better place—all within the safety of an all-girl environment where girls take the lead, learn by doing, and learn cooperatively.
    Page 14

    Journeys (Leadership Journeys) are a hands-on approach to teaching leadership skills to Girl Scouts of all ages.
    Page 139 

  • Trips - Day Trips

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Trip Planning Matrix.
    Page 115

    Day trips: The troop leader is responsible for ensuring that all safety guidelines are followed for day trips taken by the troop, and that all accompanying adults are approved volunteers and registered members. 
    Page 117

  • Traditions

    As they build leadership skills, they also develop lifelong friendships and earn meaningful awards, two of many treasured traditions in the sisterhood of Girl Scouting.
    Page 45

    Throughout the long history of Girl Scouts, certain traditions remain meaningful and important and are still practiced today. 
    Page 59

    Girl Scouts ceremonies are used not only to celebrate accomplishments, experience time-honored traditions, and reinforce the values of the Girl Scout Promise and Law, but also to encourage girls to take a short pause in their busy lives and connect with their fellow Girl Scouts in fun and meaningful ways. 
    Page 60

    The following are some traditions troops have used for girl-led governance, but these are just examples. National Leadership Journeys offer examples of team decisionmaking, too.
    Page 134

  • Religious Organization

    Community organizations, businesses, religious organizations, and individuals may be sponsors and may provide group meeting places, volunteer their time, offer in-kind donations, provide activity materials, or loan equipment.
    Page 108

    Girl Scout troops must respect the opinions and practices of religious partners, but no girl should be required to take part in any religious observance or practice of the sponsoring troop.
    Page 109

  • Promoting Fairness

    Girls are sensitive to injustice. They forgive mistakes if they are sure you are trying to be fair. Page 75

  • Instant Messaging

    Girls may use Facebook, Twitter, text messages, IMs, and emails as online marketing tools to let family, friends, and former customers know about the program. Page 106 

  • Patrol

    Patrols may be organized by interests or activities that feed into a Take Action project, with each team taking responsibility for some part of the total project; girls may even enjoy coming up with names for their teams. Page 134

  • Passengers

    Passengers should be instructed in the following safety procedures prior to transporting: » Passengers should remain seated at all times with hands and arms inside vehicle. Page 89

  • Travel - Pathways

    Although some girls who are in a group (for example, a troop of Cadettes) may decide to travel together, the Travel Pathway exists for girls who are not otherwise involved in Girl Scouts to get together Chapter 7: Trips, Travel and Events 112 Volunteer Essentials — Chapter 7: Trips, Travel and Events specifically for the purpose of traveling locally, regionally, and even internationally. Page 112

  • Private Transportation

    Private transportation includes private passenger vehicles, rental cars, privately owned or rented recreational vehicles and campers, chartered buses, chartered boats, and chartered flights. Page 87

  • Leave No Trace

    Leave No Trace means exactly what it implies, that when we venture out-of-doors, we leave no impact to show that we were there.
    Page 129

    Leave No Trace Principles for Girls. 
    Page 130

  • Troop Meeting - Closing

    Girl or small group chooses and/or leads the closing, which could be a Friendship Circle, goodbye song or activity, or the closing activity from the Journey Sample Session. Page 134

  • Lifetime Membership

    Processing and completing registration forms and other paperwork, such as Membership Registration Forms (paper forms are used when applying for financial assistance, paying with Cookie Dough, or when graduating seniors are purchasing a Lifetime Membership), permission slips, event applications, and troop financial reports to be shared with parents/guardians.
    Page 21

  • Insurance - Contact

    Insurance/Risk Management •Proof of Coverage and Extra Activity Coverage/Claims and Other Non-Troop Activity Coverage . . . . . . . 770-702-9167. Page ii

  • QSP

    As of June 2014, girls (with their parent’s supervision and permission) will be allowed to use the QSP/Great American online program site to create their own internet “storefront,” customized with the girl’s program. Page 104

  • Lake Swimming

    Lake Swimming - BR JR CD SR AM - Generally requires a swim test – girl must be comfortable swimming in water over her head. Page 92

  • Junior - Uniform

    Junior/Cadette/Senior/Ambassador Town Meeting: Under the town meeting system, business is discussed and decisions are made at meetings attended by all the girls in the troop.
    Page 32

    Girl Scout Junior Sash & Vest.
    Page 65

  • Reservations - Birthplace

    All trips invloving high risk activities, trips to the Birthplace in Savannah, extended trips (three nights or more), cruises, and international travel require written council permission in advance of the trip. Page 114

  • QSP

    As of June 2014, girls (with their parent’s supervision and permission) will be allowed to use the QSP/Great American online program site to create their own internet “storefront,” customized with the girl’s program. Page 104

  • Managing Conflict - See also Conflict Resolution

    Conflicts and disagreements are an inevitable part of life, and when handled constructively can actually enhance communication and relationships. Page 75

  • Savannah

    All trips involving high risk activities, trips to the Birthplace in Savannah, extended trips (three nights or more), cruises, and international travel require written council permission in advance of the trip.
    Page 114

    Trips to visit the Birthplace in Savannah, GA of any duration. 
    Page 115

    The Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace in Savannah, Georgia, is a fantastic place for Girl Scout Juniors and older to visit. Reservations and council approval are required to take a group of girls to visit the birthplace, and most educational opportunities are booked at least a year in advance, so book early! Families and individuals, however, do not need to reserve a tour in advance.
    Page 116

  • Mandated Reporters

    All adult volunteers who interact with girls recognize that they are mandated reporters. Page 36

  • Outdoor Training

    Refer to “Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Trip Planning Matrix” on page 115 for more information about the appropriate training and approval procedures for camping trips. Page 125

  • Troop Meeting - Business

    Troop business may include taking attendance, collecting dues, making announcements, and planning an upcoming event or trip. Page 133

  • Senior - Camping

    Currently registered Girl Scout Daisy (see special note below), Brownie, Junior, Cadette, Senior and Ambassador troops trained and accompanied by an adult who has taken council approved outdoor training, (as detailed below) and an adult with a current First Aid/CPR certification are eligible to apply for overnight camping.  Page 125

  • Learn Cooperatively

    The Girl Scout program is based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), in which girls Discover themselves, Connect with others, and Take Action to make the world a better place—all within the safety of an all-girl environment where girls take the lead, learn by doing, and learn cooperatively. 
    Page 14

    Girls have the chance to learn cooperatively.
    Page 17

    Working in a partnership with girls so that their activities are girl-led, allow them to learn by doing, and allow for cooperative (group) learning; you’ll also partner with other volunteers and GSGATL staff for support and guidance.

    Page 20 

  • Senior

    Girl Scout Senior (grades 9–10).
    Page 8

    At the Girl Scout Senior level (ninth and tenth grades), girls . . . This means . . . Are beginning to clarify their own values, consider alternative points of view on controversial issues, and see multiple aspects of a situation. 
    Page 73

  • Males - And Camping

    Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta does not allow boys over the age of 10 to participate in troop camping on GSGATL properties.  Page 118

  • Letterboxing

  • Membership - Pin

    The official uniform for Girl Scout adults is their own navy business attire, worn with an official Girl Scout scarf for women or official Girl Scout tie for men, and the Girl Scout Membership Pin and World Trefoil Pin.
    Page 32


    Girls should be identifiable as Girl Scouts by wearing a Membership Pin, official uniform, tunic, sash, vest, or other Girl Scout clothing.
    Page 104

     

  • National Program Portfolio

    We strongly recommend that each girl has her own books from the National Program Portfolio. 
    Page 46

    The next few pages give you an idea of what’s involved when you use the National Program Portfolio with girls at each Girl Scout grade level. 
    Page 51

  • Harassment

    It is the policy of GSGATL to provide all volunteers with an environment free from all forms of harassment. Page 34

  • Travel - Safety and Security

    The safety and security of the girls and adults attending Girl Scout trips is always a top priority. 
    Page 119

    Travel Security and Safety Tips. 
    Page 120

  • Service Unit - Treasury

    Service unit treasuries may consist of funds from money-earning projects, dues, donations and council-sponsored grant programs. 
    Page 37

    Troop and service unit treasuries may be used to pay for activities and projects for specific girls. 
    Page 38

    Funds for Take Action projects must be managed through council-authorized troop or service unit bank accounts.
    Page 40

  • Girl Scout Law - See Girl Scout Law - Learn By Doing

    The Girl Scout program is based on the Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE), in which girls Discover themselves, Connect with others, and Take Action to make the world a better place—all within the safety of an all-girl environment where girls take the lead, learn by doing, and learn cooperatively.
    Page 14 

    If research or special equipment is needed, they’ll learn better by doing that research themselves than by having you do the legwork and report back to them. 
    Page 17

    Working in a partnership with girls so that their activities are girl-led, allow them to learn by doing, and allow for cooperative (group) learning; you’ll also partner with other volunteers and GSGATL staff for support and guidance.
    Page 20 

  • Parasailing

    ACTIVITIES NOT PERMITTED FOR PROGRAM AT ANY AGE LEVEL potentially uncontrolled free-falling (bungee jumping, hang gliding, parachuting, parasailing, and trampolining); creating extreme variations of approved activities (such as high-altitude climbing and aerial tricks on bicycles, skis, snowboards, skateboards, water-skis, and wakeboards); hunting; shooting a projectile at another person; riding all-terrain vehicles and motor bikes; and taking watercraft trips in Class V or higher. Page 92

  • Service Unit - Dues

    Service units may collect dues from girl members.
    Page 38

    Parents may be asked (but not required) to contribute a maximum of $5 per girl per year in local service unit dues to provide for copying charges, mailing and other costs associated with providing local service to troop leaders.
    Page 99

  • Overnight Trips

    One (or possibly two) nights away to a state or national park, historic city, or nearby city for sightseeing, staying in a hotel, motel, or campground. Page 112

  • Training. See also Learning Opportunities

    GSGATL offers a variety of options, from online learning modules to face-to-face learning opportunities that allow for immediate feedback on the skills learned and knowledge gained. Page 21

  • Handshake

    The handshake is a more formal way of greeting other Girl Scouts, and is also an appropriate way to receive an award. Page 62

  • Serious Accidents

    In the event of a fatality or other serious accident, notify the police. Page 97

  • Activities - choosing

    How can you, as a Girl Scout volunteer, determine whether an activity is safe and appropriate? Good judgment and common sense often dictate the answer. Page 90

  • Activities - money-earning

    Product programs are a great way to earn the funds necessary for girls to travel or carry out Take Action projects. If income from the product programs isn’t enough, however, girls have more options available to them. Page 107